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Vitamin D and Mushrooms and UVB sunlight

Discussion in 'The Cave' started by PaulG, Sep 15, 2019.

  1. PaulG

    PaulG New Member

    From https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6213178/

    "8. Conclusions
    Mushroom consumption is increasing rapidly worldwide, with the production of mushrooms rising from 1 billion kg in 1978 to 27 billion kg in 2012 (an increase in per capita consumption from 0.25 kg to 4 kg) [18]. Since mushrooms provide nutritionally relevant amounts of B group vitamins and of the minerals selenium, potassium, copper, and zinc, they are a nutritious, low energy-dense food [73,74]. Currently, some larger commercial mushroom farms in the USA, Ireland, The Netherlands, and Australia expose fresh mushrooms to UV radiation, generating at least 10 μg D2/100 g FW; therefore, a 100 g serve would provide 50–100% of the daily required vitamin D to consumers. Exposing dried mushrooms to UV-B radiation can also generate nutritionally useful amounts of vitamin D2, although this practice is not widespread to date.

    It is conceivable that UV-B radiation post-harvest (for fresh mushrooms) or post-drying (for dried and powdered mushrooms) could become standard commercial practice. Sunlight, regular UV lamps, and pulsed UV lamps have the capability to raise the vitamin D2 concentrations to nutritional significance, although pulsed UV lamps may be the most cost-efficient method for commercial production of vitamin D-enhanced mushrooms, because of the low exposure time (often in 1–3 seconds) to achieve at least 10 μg/100 g FW. There is minimal discolouration in mushrooms after pulsed UV treatment, possibly due to the small exposure time of less than 4 seconds [42]; however, there are many reports of surface discolouration of mushrooms after longer exposures to UV radiation from UV fluorescent lamps [15,34,36,44]. Since consumers may be deterred by mushrooms discolouration, pulsed UV treatment is likely to be preferred by commercial growers.

    Vitamin D-enhanced mushrooms contain high concentrations of vitamin D2, which is bioavailable and relatively stable during storage and cooking. Therefore, consumption of vitamin D-enhanced mushrooms could substantially contribute to alleviating the global public health issue of vitamin D deficiency. Further research is warranted to determine the optimal level of UV radiation required to produce a nutritionally useful amount of vitamin D2 in mushrooms, along with optimal storage conditions and cooking methods. The physiological benefits of mushroom-derived vitamin D2 compared with solar-derived vitamin D3 also require further investigation."
     
    Jude likes this.
  2. PaulG

    PaulG New Member

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