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The Secret lives of fat cells implications for diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer

Discussion in 'Cold Thermogenesis' started by ColinGorham, Dec 9, 2019.

  1. The Secret lives of fat cells implications for diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer by Philipp Scherer Ph.D. Director of the Touchstone Diabetes Center at UT Southwestern Medical Center
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2019
    Sue-UK likes this.
  2. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

  3. I recently saw a documentary on fasting (Title: "FASTING") that features Satchidananda Panda, a circadian biology researcher at the Salk Institute and others with experience with fasting. Panda claims the benefits of "time restricted feeding" have mostly to do with the fasting window and less to do with light and dark cycles: "So if the liver clock tracks when we eat, then forget about light/dark, what we have to more careful about is when we eat and when we fast." (Fasting, Minute: 10:54)
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B...c45-cd78f07a84d8&pf_rd_r=NTJVJJYDKQ4PSHJHQZ82
    The data is also consistently pointing to a 12 hour fasting window on average as ideal for longterm intermittent fasting. Do you think 12 hours is a random time? Lol. I was shocked that Panda reached that conclusion. I guess after a longtime studying rats (night eaters) & humans (daytime eaters) his mind conflated the variables and figured light and dark is less important. I can see how research design and analysis can create blindspots where a principal investigator could miss the central point. I guess some are 15 years late in reading Jack's blog. Many others in the documentary believe avoiding food at night was most central.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2019
  4. Sue-UK

    Sue-UK Gold

    What about temperature ? Philipp Scherer spoke at the Parish NASH meeting 2019, and well as some interesting stuff connected to the liver, such as hepatic stellate cells, at 16.30 there's a brief mention about temperature …

     
  5. Of course, the speaker knows the composition of fat is determined by temperature sensors on the skin. To the pharma establishment this is a target for drug therapy. The way nature controls fat composition is not relevant to this speaker. See Jack's FB post on this.
     
  6. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    European clinical guidelines on how to treat a major form of heart disease are under review following an investigation. Apparently. leaked data reveals patients that had received stents had 80% more heart attacks than those who had open-heart surgery in Excel trial.
    It showed that half the investigators declared personal fees from stent companies and a third of those on the taskforce writing the guidelines. Evidence based sham = #followthemoney
    https://bbc.in/2RBlDt6
     
  7. I turned on fm radio in the car and just happened to hear about this story. There is clearly a need for more transparency and disclosure in research. Somethings sorely needs changing here but count me as not optimistic that change will come in an official manner. Thank you to the people of conscience out there.
     
  8. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    The best anti-inflammatory is sunlight.
    People who take NSAIDs and aspirin lack sunlight. Sunlight provides 42% red light all day no matter how cloudy it is or where you are on the planet. The red light in the sun heals cells because of evolutionary design. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/31170016/
     
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