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Sue-UK Journal 2018/19

Discussion in 'My Optimal Journal' started by Sue-UK, May 26, 2018.

  1. Phosphene

    Phosphene Gold (finally)

    You’ve come SO far in a short time Susan. Congrats! :thumbsup:

    (From some of your other posts you should add oxy to your list of accomplishments too. ;))
     
  2. Billybats

    Billybats New Member

    I forgot to add T as need under the water.
     
  3. Billybats

    Billybats New Member

    Not sure if you were answer me or Sue-UK. Yes oxy is on that list:)
     
  4. Phosphene

    Phosphene Gold (finally)

    Whoops, forgot this is Sue-UK’s journal. (Though I get the impression she’s got this avenue well covered too. :D) I’m envious of you both.
     
  5. Sue-UK

    Sue-UK Gold

    Neither do I …:confused::D

    I was reading about fingertips regrowing after amputation (under specific conditions such as not stitching the wound), 3/8ths of an inch in 2 years, apparently even the new finger prints were the same as before - which implies access to the blueprint … Not exactly salamander regenerative power but interesting …. 'This type of recovery happened only if the electric potential flowing into the wound was left unchanged. Sewing the finger up appeared to have changed its potential and, in such cases, reported by Professor Bernard Watson of St Bartholomew's Hospital, though the fingers healed they did not regrow.' (Source The Dark Side of the Brain by Harry Oldfield and Roger Coghill).

    I'm on the hunt for the regeneration pathway - and the liver seems to be the ultimate regenerating organ - so if being too deuterium depleted can slow wound healing, I think deuterium may play a role. (The other side of the coin could be slow wound healing in diabetics - too much deuterium but its locked up in liver/visceral fat?) I'm already avoiding yellow after sunset (because it drops naturally then), its interesting that in the Spectrochrome system yellow is an alimentary tract energizer, digestant, cathartic, and cholegogue …. so I think subtracting yellow at the right time could be important. Regeneration needs peace and quiet? I've also been thinking about the placenta, as a supplier of circadian information (and deuterium?) to a foetus. The placenta quantum relationship with the liver is possibly why belly grounding in the sun is awesome. Last night I taped a grounding pad onto my belly button, the wire connected to an outside grounding rod. (I already use a yoga grounding mat as a runner on the bottom of the bed). I've already tried it on my forehead under my from the freezer migraine cap, but its not on all night, and it didn't seem to be right (or possibly the right thing at the wrong time). So I've wondered if my liver getting a better sensing of the earth's movement through the magnetotail through the night in the absence of yellow (and UV?) and hopefully improving its magnetic strength could be useful first. If nothing else it gave DH something new to roll his eyes at :rolleyes: - :D
     
    Phosphene likes this.
  6. Sue-UK

    Sue-UK Gold

    http://iicbe.org/upload/8074C0915054.pdf Determination of Deuterium concentration in Biological fluids by NMR Spectroscopy.

    'In condition of consuming water with a reduced content of deuterium, the greatest change in the deuterium concentration was observed in the oral fluid and blood plasma, whereas fluctuations in the deuterium concentration in breast milk were significantly less.'

     
    Phosphene and JanSz like this.
  7. Billybats

    Billybats New Member

    So then if my wounds heal(close) by the end of the day I must have a good deuterium balance. Cool way of knowing. No I'm not going to be cutting my self every so often to see how things are going..lol.. but being accident prone will take care of that..haha. what about bruising. .:rolleyes::D
     
    Phosphene likes this.
  8. drezy

    drezy Gold

    There's still time to go through a goth girl phase Billybats
     
    Phosphene likes this.
  9. Sue-UK

    Sue-UK Gold

    The lower figures for group 2 lactating women seems to indicate that the experiment wasn't in the best interests of the baby at such a critical time in their development, so the ethics of deliberately using 60 ppm DDW for lactating women leaves me uncomfortable. But it shows an example of when less than 150 ppm blood plasma is related to a natural event as opposed to cancer.

    Presumably the group 2 mothers were drawing deuterium from storage to make up any deficit, (does fat deposits around the belly and hips during pregnancy contain more deuterium than other SQ fat?) But what did that deuterium 'starvation' do to baby's epigenetic switches?

    'In condition of consuming water with a reduced content of deuterium, the greatest change in the deuterium concentration was observed in the oral fluid and blood plasma, whereas fluctuations in the deuterium concentration in breast milk were significantly less.'

    At 60 ppm water for 25-30 days prior to the test for group 2, it seems that it was important for the mothers to try and maintain deuterium content of their breast milk at the expense of their blood plasma and oral fluid. I was wondering if the high deuterium in oral fluid in Group 1 may be a generalised mammalian throwback to licking and grooming pups (deuterium plus UVA = UVC), or adding pro growth deuterium (along with enzymes) etc when pre-chewing food.

    But in terms of deuterium in saliva, breath and urine - low doesn't necessarily mean 'good' if it should fluctuate normally in health or as part of the reproductive cycle, (gender differences?) or if it means the pathways aren't functioning properly.

    I have a feeling that under controlled conditions deuterium is involved in igniting and maintaining the spark of life ….(conception, generation, regeneration....?) and uncontrolled conditions favour the extinguishing of life (degeneration and cancer).
     
    Phosphene likes this.
  10. JanSz

    JanSz Gold

     
  11. JanSz

    JanSz Gold

    @Jack Kruse

    I am beginning to think that the
    blood plasma = 150ppm or even (150-149)
    is not as solid as I initially thought.
    ----

    Also, looks like drinking DDW (DDW-60ppm for a month in this case) affects plasma more than oral fluid.
    ====================================
    http://iicbe.org/upload/8074C0915054.pdf
    upload_2018-8-8_8-4-19.png





    upload_2018-8-8_8-6-43.png
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2018
  12. Sue-UK

    Sue-UK Gold

    I was wondering if the importance of post natal and lactation bonding links the oral fluid deuterium figures to oxytocin?
     
    Phosphene likes this.
  13. Sue-UK

    Sue-UK Gold

    Putting this here so I don't lose it. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4554231/ Oxytocin Expression and Function in the Posterior Retina: A Novel Signaling Pathway

    Think there's a song The look of love is in your eyes …. :D Doubt its the same on skype or facetime etc. :whistle:
     
    caroline, Phosphene and drezy like this.
  14. drezy

    drezy Gold

    I also think women are more sensitive too.

    Have you ever seen an attractive woman even look in the general direction of a man? It's like looking at a dog while holding bacon. So I suppose us guys are a little biased toward assuming "That must have been the look of love".
     
  15. Billybats

    Billybats New Member

    Lolhahaaaaa. . Funny you say that as I sit here in black shorts and tank top, bit just because it's comfy.
     
  16. Sue-UK

    Sue-UK Gold

    I went to visit my aunt yesterday, who moved a year ago to an amazing place on the edge of the same town as before. A couple of minutes walk to the town centre, but in a log cabin in woodland surrounding the castle. No noise from the town, just the sounds of nature in the woodland. My cousin and her husband now live in what was the old head gardeners house, so they have a good sized plot, and put the cabin in for her to be close by. Stunning location, but with lots of steps up to the pathway to the town, on paper it seemed a lot for an 85 year old to take on …. but she took us on the guided tour, showed us the gardening she had taken on at the main garden, she was laughing and joking, full of energy … DH and I would happily live in a place like that … deer, badgers, foxes … yet she's close enough to civilisation to enjoy walking to church, her book club and all her other interests that involve her with socialising with other people, close to my cousin but living independently. If anything, her cognitive function has improved since living there. What heartened me most was that as my mother's sister, she shares the same maternal line. She was widowed in the same week my mother was, (that was one hell of a week ….), yet since then her cognitive function trajectory has been so different because of the choices she has made. And this move seems to have been a good one. :cool:
     
  17. Sue-UK

    Sue-UK Gold

    So does looking at a sunrise and sunset with appreciation and love raise the oxytocin in the retina? I'd like to think that not watching scary movies helps conserve my retinas oxytocin levels. :)
     
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  18. Sue-UK

    Sue-UK Gold

    The weather is definitely more autumnal. I've noticed the slow change in the season since after the summer solstice, but our unusual long hot spell seems to be over for a while, and this morning CT now seemed more like CT … Outside under overcast skies, a cooler, damper morning … watching a woodpecker … Waited for the dopamine shift, and it was actually nice to get out feeling really cold, but there being enough warmth through the clouds to make the warm up easier. I think Jack described cloudy days as red light days … it certainly felt like a red light CT session. :cool:
     
    Sheddie likes this.
  19. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    98F here in NOLA. Autumn comes here in November.
     
    Sue-UK likes this.
  20. Sue-UK

    Sue-UK Gold

    CT in the pouring rain this morning, watching 8 collared doves in the trees in front of me. Bird behaviour changing … About to book our October temporary migration to Fuerteventura. :cool:
     
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