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Resistance Training while following the Epi-Paleo RX

Discussion in 'The Epi-Paleo Diet' started by wardog0351, Nov 16, 2014.

  1. wardog0351

    wardog0351 New Member

    I've been in NK for a while now and I'm ready to closely adhere to the epi paleo Rx. I've read the book and feel that I have a solid handle on the lifestyle and the seasonal changes that will take place. The one question I couldn't find an answer to was the ability to follow a resistance training routine. Right now I'm lifting 3 days a week and I'm not sure if I'll need to adjust anything once I make the switch. It was difficult (to say the least) while adapting to NK to sustain my training routine and modifications had to be made. Will this again be the case???
     
  2. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    If you are leptin sensitive you need HIIT.......if not wait til you are.
     
  3. BTA

    BTA New Member

  4. ssj3

    ssj3 Silver

    The only way to workout??? The goals/abilities of the individual have nothing to do with this?

    Do you own one of those SuperSlow franchises BTA?
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2014
  5. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    BTA you're treading on thin ice............
     
  6. wardog0351

    wardog0351 New Member

    I HIIT 2x a week (sprint tabatha/heavy bag or rope work) and lift 3 days a week all at 3pm.
     
  7. BTA

    BTA New Member

    Why? if you're familar with Super Slow then you'll know why it's the only way to workout. Kettle bells are useless, running is useless ect... Just look up the Colorado Experiment.
     
  8. wardog0351

    wardog0351 New Member

    You can't make a sweeping statement like that...its all relative! You need to take your goals into consideration. Everything has a place!
     
  9. BTA

    BTA New Member

    If you would research Super Slow - goals, age, ability, fitness level ect - doesn't matter. Results will be seen - over 30 years of clear evidence based research. The truth is you only need 3 minutes of exercise a week to be the maximum benefit.


     
  10. Josh

    Josh Gold

    Where does hibernation fit in this discussion.....o_O
     
    wardog0351 likes this.
  11. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    wardog0351 likes this.
  12. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    wardog0351 likes this.
  13. wardog0351

    wardog0351 New Member

    Not buying Super Slow...
     
  14. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    You need a pic up........and I agree on super slow.
     
  15. CTforlife

    CTforlife New Member

    I don't know if it's optimal or not, but the healthier I become the more I only desire to lift super heavy near my max and not anything below it. Like 1-6 reps is what I like normally when I use to use 8-12 consistently. I get better results lifting heavy and it feels just optimal. What's your experience ?
     
    wardog0351 likes this.
  16. prAna303

    prAna303 New Member

    Just the words...
    • Investment – Startup costs are low and we’re looking for talented, multi-unit operators with $100,000 in cash or liquid assets.
     
  17. ssj3

    ssj3 Silver

  18. BTA

    BTA New Member

    do you have any references that CT works from peer reviewed journals?

    Superslow training, originated in 1982 by Ken Hutchins, was developed in an osteoporosis study with older women because of the need to utilize a safer speed for subjects to perform the resistance exercises. The result was the beginning of a new resistance training technique, which became known as superslow strength training.
    Westcott, 1999
    Smith, Weiss, and Lehmkuhl, 1995

    two peer-reviewed manuscripts have been written
    *A* Westcott et al. (2001) The results indicated that the slow speed group attained superior strength gains, gaining an average of 26 lbs in strength for the 13 exercises combined
    *B* Westcott et al. (1999 ) slow speed group achieved higher results that the regular speed group, gaining an average of 24 lbs


    Westcott, W. (1999). The scoop on super slow strength training. Idea Personal Trainer, Nov-Dec, 37-42.
    Westcott, W. L., Winett, R. A., Anderson, E. S., Wojcik, J. R., Loud, R. L. R., Cleggett, E., & Glover, S. (2001). Effects of regular and slow speed resistance training on muscle strength. Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, 41, 154-158.
    Effects of regular and slow speed resistance training on muscle strength
    CONCLUSIONS: Super-Slow training is an effective method for middle-aged and older adults to increase strength.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11447355
    .
     
  19. ssj3

    ssj3 Silver

    Effective for individuals with certain limitations. NOT better.

    If peer review studies are your thing BTA read the comments section of the last link I posted. It has reference to studies comparing 'traditional' to super slow.
     
  20. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    BTA has entered the penalty box............I warned you to curb you posting and behavior. There are hundreds of cites on CT in the literature. When you add something of value to the site you I will credit you. Right now you are taking a vacation based upon all the complaints you generate.
     
    wardog0351 likes this.

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