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Please help me understand, about diabetes and cold

Discussion in 'Cold Thermogenesis' started by Malkavian, Apr 6, 2012.

  1. Malkavian

    Malkavian New Member

    Hello,

    I just joined this forum, and while I have read all CT blog posts, there are some things that I don't really understand.

    I hope I can ventilate my thoughts here and learn from you all, what you think.



    First, this thing that diabetes could possibly be reversed by cold. Fascinating. What I was thinking about this:

    I confess that I know basically nothing about diabetes, but I was wondering, concerning type 1 and 1.5 that Kruse mentioned could be reversed by cold; is it only us westernized, so called civilized people that are seen with these kinds of diabetes?



    If not: if a person in a traditional culture, for instance Africa, have this kind of diabetes, and having no option to experience cold/winter long enough to experience a cold adaptation.....I frankly don't know how to express my bewilderment, hopefully you can understand my thoughts...:confused:



    If someone lives somewhere where winters aren't cold enough, and you have diabetes type 1, you're screwed unless you live with modern artificial medicine?



    Does this disease only appear where people are able to cold adapt, but don't?



    This question has got nothing to do with me, I don't have diabetes myself. Just for the sake of information. =)



    Regards,

    Malkavian
     
  2. MamaGrok

    MamaGrok New Member

    A person in a traditional culture does not get diabetes unless he's no longer eating his traditional diet .. BUT that exists almost nowhere on earth anymore.



    It's one of the standard "diseases of civilization."
     
  3. Malkavian

    Malkavian New Member

    I always though that was the case with type 2 diabetes, and that type 1 was hereditary?

    But as I said, I have no knowledge about diabetes, so I do hear you out.



    Another thing I was thinking about was that most of people living in climates with really cold winters, are only able to do so today because of artificial heat sources (we don't teach each other how "heat" is made from scratch, we teach our offspring that all you have to do is press a button). With such knowledge mostly forgotten/ignored, don't you think that if we would be forced to (because of economic, followed by energy collapse, for instance) people would be moving as close to the equator as possible, thereby losing this cold adaption opportunity? Well... if/when such a scenario is blown up large scale, the diet part and the major health problem would probably fix itself, right? Local, natural food. =)
     
  4. MamaGrok

    MamaGrok New Member

    Oh, type 1 is a disease of civilization, too. Almost any "hereditary" disease is really a matter of "your body will fight to maintain your life in X unnatural conditions at the expense of Y," where Y is going to depend on your genes. It's epigenetic.



    One example is that the incidence of type 1 is increased in formula-fed babies. There are many factors which can contribute to this particular epigenetic switch being flipped.



    If these diseases were truly hereditary, they would have been selected out long, long ago.



    As far as doomsday, I think more than half the population of the world would be dead before anyone was able to move to the equator. I've said for a while now that if you disrupt the grocery store supply chain for more than a month, more of the US dies.
     

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