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My little mito-hack and awesome adventure.

Discussion in 'Biohacking 101' started by Simon Wright, Feb 7, 2017.

  1. MohawkSteel

    MohawkSteel Jeremy Thomley

    This is wonderful:)
    Simon Wright and Lahelada like this.
  2. 'My experiences an reflections'

    As said in my introductory piece I did this for the adventure but I wanted to see what my body did as well.

    Please bear in mind I live in Indonesia and whilst all you guys have great diagnostics and testing at close reach, the medical facilities and testing capacities here are in a word ‘terrible’. Therefore I cannot validate all of this via testing and it shall be on the basis of anecdotal evidence.

    Upon my decision to go to Papua I delved into what the risks there were and all the usual ones came up….dysentry, malaria, infections, insect bites etc etc . Anyway admittedly I did take malaria tablets and also some antibiotics for infections. For the malaria I carried Doxycycline and for the infections I took a generic ceftriaxone in tablet form. To note I do not take antibiotics and if I use them I only crush the tablets and use them topically (they are too hard on my gut).

    When I arrived I asked about malaria and all the boys said they got it every 6-8 weeks…my jaw dropped. I asked what they took for it….they said they drank the papaya flower and papaya leaf tea. I enquired if they took antibiotics, they all laughed and said no that it made then feel worse….it was better to ‘not sleep, eat as much as you can and you should be ok in 2-3 days’. So with that I emptied my Malaria tablets onto the ground as I did not want this worry in the back of my mind.

    I also remember Jack speaking with a fellow who had been in Africa and on the back of this talk I decided I wouldn’t wear a shirt the whole trek. Seeing as we were walking thru the jungle under foliage the whole time, due to the abundance of tropical light, I figured I would be charging my blood plasma and mitigating any possible heavy onset of the malaria (thankfully I didn’t get it).

    My other consideration in wearing no shirt was I was wearing Wellington boots (Wellies) and though this was diminishing my grouding capacity I thus wanted to counter this by having my ‘solar panels’ out. To note since I have increased my sulfur intake and DHA via seafood I don’t too easily get sunburnt. Also as I live here I have a year round sun callous.

    To note I don’t wear sunglasses.

    For sleeping I slept either on a bit of bark or in a hammock, I mainly slept in the hammock as it had a mosquito net included in the setup. In the way I set this up I slung it as close to the ground as I could to try and get some of the magnetic flux at might, but I am pretty sure with the magnetic flux being so minimal I was just going through semantics. When I go back there in April I will modify as mosquito net and sleep on the ground potentiate my hack. (in the dense jungle areas this will not be achievable though and have to sleep in hammock).

    Sunrise was about 6 , and as I usually wake at 4.45ish most days , I just lay about and then just before sunrise would start the cooking fire up. Sunset was about 6.45pm and generally we had eaten or were eating at sunset. We were not long off bed by 8.00pm most nights. Admittedly there was a lamp for everyone to see with, but I generally snuck away to make sure I optimized my sleep. When I go back I am planning to not take a lamp.

    When in the campsite I would be barefoot and just in my shorts or just a pair of undies (underpants). I would be sitting on ground or at least have barefoot connection for the whole time in camp.

    My sleep and general sense of calm after this trip was definitely heightened. Also my physical condition (other than the multiple infections on the fronts of my legs from falling off logs) was very good. I felt super strong and very light footed. As we were walking on a lot of thin (and slippery ) logs my core was definitey fired up.

    My sensitivity to non natural light after the two weeks away was very noticeable. The mercury vapour energy saver lights here are very popular and I found them unbearable.

    Upon getting back home I awoke the morning after arriving and went for a run down the beach I ran about 3 times as far as I usually did. Admittedly even after all the trekking I had done I was feeling great.

    Another thing I did was emulate thir body posture. They walked very upright and carried their elbows slightly behind their back line. In doing so this opens up their chest , and in my mind this would give your organs a lot more space to function. In today society I find we tend to lean forward in too many functions.

    The most interesting point was when they crossed a small thin log going over a swamp or river they did not put their hands out to balance as I would normally do. They bought them to the centerline of their body and then slightly bent their legs and arched their bum out. This was very impressive for me as as soon as I started doing this my capacity to walk across small logs was greatly increased (to note I fell off the first log I crossed, then after studying the guy in front of me’s body stature I didn’t fall of any until the 2nd last day) This was a very cool thing for me to learn.

    If we stopped for a swim and a drink I always took the majority of my clothes off and went and sat in the sun for 15 minutes.

    Outside of all of the physical and material considerations the another thing I learnt is about our social conditioning. I realized how stressed we are. Whether it be money, possesions, body image, fashion, social status, ego, religion, social sterotypes, death. These people were not phased by this and for the first time in my life I saw absolute freedom ( try holding a sincere conversation with a stranger with their genitals and anus staring you in the face). I realized how much we are bound by our egos and how much pressure this then puts ourselves and this then would have physiological impacts (cortisol , inflammation etc etc ). So upon my return I have released myself from : the stesses of money and business , yes I am still functioning within this realm and run my business with 85 employees, but my attitude towards it has changed and its not running me. The egotistical concerns and reactions to situations where I would usually get fired up have beeb put to bed and they are not a concern anymore. I have realized how absolutely pathetic we get about a lot of things and how this often doesn’t change anything….. it only harms yourself and the people around you. I now just smile and walk on by. This for sure was the greatest gift from seeing such a HUGELY different perspective on living.



    To Frame this realization I will give a story. Pak Erty was the head porter and he walked in front the whole way, one day he was walking and we doubled back 3 times over the space of an hour and a half. After another 30 minutes went by I asked him ,becoming a bit perturbed (usual western control complex), “Pak Erty are you lost”, with which he smiled and replied “No…why?”. I then went on to explain how we had doubled back so many times over the last couple of hours. His response was “Its ok….I am just waiting for the jungle to talk to me, we know each other ….and we we talk……because when I go (die) from here I will become the jungle ” All of this was said with a smile in a low disconcerted tone. I was schooled.

    As mentioned in my introduction I have had major surgery on my shoulder. I have 3 large stainless steel screws running down the middle of it. I didn’t have any say in this and am now stuck with it. Rather than look negatively upon this, I have found that this is a great early warning system for inflammation in my body. It is easily aggravated by plane travel, late nights , bad food etc etc. After my trip into the jungle I have to say my shoulder was 100% pain free….which is unusual as there is usually a niggle.

    My attitude to exercise has changed. I do not over exert myself anymore….i just do enough. I concentrate on posture and body position and am very conscious to work through full range of motions. I didn’t once see the people there over exert themselves….they were extremely dynamic and swift with their movement , but they certainly were very conserving in their energy expenditure.

    I am conscious of time spent on my computer as well (I don’t own a TV…haven’t for 16 years). Yes I work and do things which are worthwhile but I find that the computer can be a trap as much as a TV. Yes they are great for research , sourcing and sharing ideas. But also they can be a source of worry fear and anger and it is these elements I am trying to remove from my life by not bothering with the volumes of info which really do not affect me.

    I am going back to the jungle in April and this time I am just going my myself (no guide) and will grab only 2 porters. I will take 30% of what I took on this last trip. I will take enough food for 1 week and within this time we will build our own bows , arrows and spears and then we will head off and hunt and gather all our food for another 2 weeks. We will not go and try find the village people we will just exist in the jungle. I will still wear the ‘wellies’ as footwear with the synthetic football socks as they are a must in the jungle. I wont wear a shirt. I will be naked or in my undies as much as I can when not trekking. I will modify the mosquito net and sleep on the ground each night….and then I will hopefully post another round of what I observed when I get back ; )

    I want to take this moment to sincerely thank Jack for the info you are putting out there. I don’t take it all in , but enough to give me the ability to think about my surrounds and make positive changes. For me there is no ‘one asnwer’ to our problems. We must undertand the tapestry of each of our lives and make the changes ourselves…..not lean on a doctor to perform miracles. The panacea for me is this knowledge and ability to make formidable positive changes in our own lives.



    To repeat an earlier point. You can never fully ‘hack’ nature, you are a fool to think so. Yes you can mitigate a lifestyle, but you can never hack nature……..just get out into it.
  3. I journalled my whole trip on facebook when i got back...... this was my last post.


    dop and his baby girl.jpg
    This is Dop. Dop and his woman have just had this beautiful little girl. The Korawaii people are semi nomadic. They change their camp/house every 3-5 years. They invest in their futures by letting areas fully restore before moving back there. In addition they plant more food plants to flourish naturally in the jungle so they are even more abundant for their return in the future. Dop has no money. He owns nothing. But he is investing in his daughters future by offering her a pristine environment with plenty of high quality food that is being managed sustainably.........Dop is gifting a much more valuable resource to his daughter than a sportscar, a mansion or stock portfolio.

    This begs to question 'who are the civilized ones'?
  4. Rubicon

    Rubicon Avoiding Equilibrium

    Simon, this thread is...incredible. Thanks for it!
    Simon Wright and Danny like this.
  5. Danny

    Danny Gold

    You can really hear the appreciation you have for this experience in your writing. Thanks for sharing this.
    Simon Wright likes this.
  6. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    Deep message here for the civilized humans. Will they heed the message?
  7. Scompy

    Scompy Gold

    Maybe this could be converted into a blog-post in the future...? One of the most profound experiences I have read about in a long time.
    caroline and Jude like this.
  8. lohd2015

    lohd2015 Silver

    Simon, thank you so much for sharing this truly precious experience with us. I feel so inspired by your courage and spirit.

    Your experiences confirm my belief that once we are truly connected with nature, our bodies will naturally and instinctively gravitate towards optimal. Your body will 'tell' you what to do as it will feel 'right'. I am sure that is how these amazing people came to have great posture and ease in movement.

    I was especially impressed with your keen observations:

    "Another thing I did was emulate thir body posture. They walked very upright and carried their elbows slightly behind their back line. In doing so this opens up their chest , and in my mind this would give your organs a lot more space to function. In today society I find we tend to lean forward in too many functions.

    The most interesting point was when they crossed a small thin log going over a swamp or river they did not put their hands out to balance as I would normally do. They bought them to the centerline of their body and then slightly bent their legs and arched their bum out. This was very impressive for me as as soon as I started doing this my capacity to walk across small logs was greatly increased (to note I fell off the first log I crossed, then after studying the guy in front of me’s body stature I didn’t fall of any until the 2nd last day) This was a very cool thing for me to learn."

    These days, fitness gurus place a lot of importance on how one maintains good posture. Most will tell you to 'open the chest' by incorrectly instructing one to push the shoulders back. By standing erect and "carrying the elbows slightly behind the backline" and not forcing the shoulder back, one naturally opens up the chest. I bet they have a small curve in their lower back also?

    The crossing of the log is even more intuitive. By slightly bending their legs, muscle stability is greatly increased and the ability to balance is enhanced. By arching their bum out, I believe they are firming the gluteus medius and tensor fascia latae muscles in the outer hip that prevents one from collapsing.

    These days as I sit on the porch under the sun, I find myself instinctively shifting to a more 'comfortable' posture that a while ago would have been tremendously difficult to maintain.

    I wish you and your team all the best in your next venture into the jungle in April. We all look forward eagerly to your posts.
    Scompy and Danny like this.


  9. Yes Lohd,
    I concur with all your points above and when they point their bum out, there is an arch of the back. Being a surfer i see this as achieving a greater area of control over the centre point of your body ie you are able to use the tension of your muscles to adjust and hold through a variety of movements rather than if you were fully extended.

    I actually likened their bums to African peoples bums....prominent and well muscled.

    Glad you enjoyed.....me too ; )

    s
    lohd2015 likes this.
  10. PaulG

    PaulG Gold

    Amazing story and reflections Simon..thanks so much for sharing..I actually tried to adjust my walking stance when I walked the dogs this morning.

    Maybe consider contacting Erwan LeCore and Danial Vitalis I am sure they would find it equally fascinating...maybe there is a book in this..you seem to be a very good writer.

    Looking forward to hearing more in April
  11. Inger

    Inger Silver

    Simon, I just have a few questions for you...

    1. They were barefeet all the time. Why could you not be? Is it because you feet did not have that thick a skin on them or because dangerous animals that could bite one?

    2. Did they get many kids? Because they have no birth control... I wonder how they handle that, or did they naturally have larger space between getting pregnant?

    3. Did they have the same partner through life or do they change partners or have many women/men?

    4. How old were they/the oldest? Did they count their age at all?

    5. I wonder why their women have this "dress" and the men have nothing.. was there a reason for this?

    6. Why did the men have this funny thing on their penises? What is it?

    7. How do the men find women... because to get fresh blood into the tribe they could not marry the relatives, or can they?

    Thank you :love: for sharing these awesome adventures with us.. :love: :love:
    lohd2015, JanSz and Danny like this.
  12. Thanks Pau. I will surely post when i get back from April

    Simon

  13. HI Inger,

    I will respond pont by point
    1] I tried for the first day. To note I am self employed so i can get as 'quantum crazy' as i want and other than walking into a restaurant to meet clients....i dont wear shoes. I have got pretty good pads on my feet and i tried to go barefoot. But there are so many thorns and barbs hat my feet werent to level the locals were. In addition there is the sago palm.....this habitate low lieing area and below is a picture of the thorns on it...they are about 4 inches long. I guess in short my feet werent 'jungle fit'. However to mitigate this i didnt wear a shirt the whole time and also when we rested i took my shoes and most of my clothes off and we were always on the ground. Sago Palm thorns.jpg

    2. There were alot of kids. But also yes there was alot of child mortality. I guess that is natures selection process

    3. There was usually two guys and a few women.....they didnt just have one life partner no. They were a community and a very respectful one at that. In one larger village a man has assaulted or raped a woman and the rest of the group went and caught him (he ran away) and then delivered some pretty brutal village punishment (i left before all this happened as it wasn't my place to be there, but basically they fire arrows into him). As said in my earlier post 'everything is shared.....it was a very fair and endearing system of community they had.

    4 No they dont count their age but the oldest guy i saw was about 65 or so....he was still climbing the ladder to the house. Whilst he didnt hunt much he mainly prepared fires and other foods.

    5. I think its because of menstruation. They explained it as 'when they get of age'...I did ask this and in the broken explanation i guess this was my assumption

    6. Its a leaf. They wrap there penis with it and actually push the penis back down into the body. I guess this gets it out of the way for when moving through the jungle as there are loads of whip vines, spurs and alike. They use similar 'systems of coverings' in other tribes like the "koteka" which is a gourd...and thus a protectionary measure.

    7. Good questions Inger. There was definitely no reception for the phone so Tinder wasn't an option ; ) I actually never asked this question....but i do know that sometimes women are stolen and this is why they use the tree house set up.

    It was also my pleasure to share with you Inger. I hope all is well in your part of the world

    Simon
    Inger, caroline and lohd2015 like this.
  14. Evan Brand

    Evan Brand Podcaster and Functional Medicine Practitioner

    Amazing story and experience Simon, thank you so much for sharing this.

    Jack sent me this on Twitter so I had to stop everything I was doing. I would read entire books on this subject. I often dream about the way of life that is possible in the jungle. It's amazing.

    I'm glad that in the year 2017, this way of life still exists. Truly grateful!
  15. Hi Evan,

    Thanks and yes it is amazing. You can do it if you want....and highly recommend it..i guess the first time is a little 'touristy' as you need a guide.

    But i am planning to go back in April and have planned with two of the porters to only bring enough food for a week, within which time we shall fashion our own bows, arrows and spears etc etc and then go and live in the jungle for some time. I am most looking forward to this as we will be on our own time and schedule and just existing (hunting , preparing and relaxing). To add i won't take alot of modern conveniences (mainly gifts of welcoming for people we come across like coffee and tobacco) . The most important of this is i wont take is a 'light' of any sort, as i really want to see what effect this has. This will be a bit more of a total hack/test than what i have just been on.

    If I am not eaten by a crocodile ; )....i will write about my journey after.

    Cheers

    Simon
    lohd2015, Rubicon and Toby King like this.
  16. Inger

    Inger Silver

    Thanks Simon. I appreciate it so much that you take time to share your experiences! Awesome!

    Those thorns look dangerous..lol The natives must have really hard foot soles to not mind walking barefoot in the jungle..wow. So different from here... I can walk bare feet easily in the woods in the wild, it is mostly soft and not much risk to get injuries at all.

    High death rate in newborns... yes I guess too the strongest survive. Makes one think about how different our culture handle it. We try to save the weakest and sickest one too and we are pretty good at it. It is beautiful to be able to save lives but I does makes us weaker because the natural selection thing is off.....

    Boah.. I would love you to start excursions / camps in the jungle sans any civilisation for us and other interested to join.....and to experience what the difference is.
    If one had an illness.. and would attend such a camp... what would happen.....

    One more question came into my mind.
    Did you get a feeling if they had more of a patriarch culture or was it matriarch? Or equal?
  17. HI Inger

    Yes the thorns are certainly rather menacing. However when you see the people dismantling the sago tree they all cut the palm and place it thorms down.....like the unwritten law of respect for others that will pass there later.

    I concur 100% with your 2nd point.

    You dont need to go to the extent that i did.....go camp a little ways into the forest by a stream....stay there for a few days, sleep on the ground, drink some water from a stream.....go for a few hikes....and see how you feel. This is where i have my giggle because in all of Jacks hyper complex stuff (that i love) basically the bottom line is ...get your ass into nature (well that is my take away) ....all the hacking , testing etc is for the mitigation/correction of a sub optimal environment (my reflection only). In nature whilst you may not be able to undo 40 years of mistakes......you will sure go home feeling alot better than when you arrived.

    The men are the head of the village i guess that is just due to the strength they posses and they live in an environment which this would be a determining factor. But there was no suppression on any level. THey were very meek and mild people and rather quiet. I never saw the men ordering anyone about. IN fact there was an old woman with a dog tooth necklace that was acting like the little general more than anyone.
    caroline and Inger like this.
  18. Inger

    Inger Silver

    Thanks, Simon :love:
    They do sound like very loving people indeed!

    I too love the simplicity of Jacks message... Just connect to nature! And sure I feel the effects.....they are so wonderful! Almost unreal how easy it is in fact, to feel awesome :) :)

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