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Leaky Gut/Candida Die-off?

Discussion in 'Adrenal Rx and Leaky Gut Rx' started by kris90, Jun 21, 2016.

  1. kris90

    kris90 New Member

    I was just wondering Jack, what are your thoughts on the potential "die-off" symptoms when treating candida with diet (i.e. carb/sugar restriction) and adopting an Epi-Paleo diet for the first time as a first line of attack? Not to mention liberal use of coconut oil, and probiotics (both supplemental and through sauerkraut and kombucha) as well as moderate amounts of oregano oil?

    I have been having leaky gut/digestive issues on and off for the past few years and have always been able to manage/correct it with a basic, short term keto diet (non epi-paleo), but it always seems to return with a vengeance when under chronic stress (which causes me to crave and binge on sugar). This time around, I have been following the Epi-Paleo diet religiously (along with my antifungals and probiotics as mentioned above), and noticed my symptoms of bloating, cramping, trapped gas, and fatigue have become worse. Could this perhaps be due to die-off/detox? I never seemed to experience this before. The fatigue is debilitating and I'm now experiencing headaches which is a rare occurrence for me. One thing is that I sleep like a damn baby everynight (no matter what health issues I struggle with, my sleep is almost never compromised). Most likely due to living in suburbs where the air is fresh and I've been getting a ton of sunlight exposure.
  2. kris90

    kris90 New Member

    New symptoms last night/this morning: terrible nausea and bloating (feeling uncomfortably full before bed despite not eating 4 hours prior), chills all night, racing heartbeat, feeling dizzy getting out of bed, brutal headache upon waking and a mild fever. Also the constipation is bad (haven't gone in a couple days, and even then, poop was a type 1 on the bristol chart.

    Are these die-off symptoms? I just need reassurance, that will help motivate me to keep going with what I'm doing. I just came back from the hospital, and was given a laxative, and advised to come back tomorrow for bloodwork and xrays if I'm not feeling any better.
  3. TANN

    TANN New Member

    Just reading this and thinking HCL betain pepsin would help you. I'm taking it currently as I have long standing issues with leaky gut and constipation.
    Having said that I've started leptin reset and CT face and have noticed already some profound changes. I'm also catching sun rise each day and doing some grounding plus daylight when I can. I'm feeling like I may be on the mend. Jack is clearly thee man
    caroline likes this.
  4. Allin

    Allin New Member

    EMF causes leaky gut and compromises the blood brain barrier....and makes you dehydrated. Constipation = you are dehydrated. Step 1. Set your eye clock. Step 2. Set your eye clock. Did I tell you to set your eye clock? Step 3. Drink some GOOD water. Keep trucking brother.
    TANN likes this.
  5. TANN

    TANN New Member

    Hi
    Love it! Thanks Allin for your help. I'm stood waiting for sunrise right now. So you lead me to believe that maybe i can forget about the HCL eventually. I have actually cut back all my supplements at the moment. So I only take ester C, B complex plus charcol. I find that I needthe activated charcoal as in bed I get sleep apnea sometimes. This I think is due to thbacterial imbalance and the charcoal helps to settle this. Or maybe it's my EMF loading? I did use my wifi straight before bed. I know that's not clever but hey I was researching in these forums lol.
    Thanks once again my friend for your help V
  6. kris90

    kris90 New Member

    Wow this was so long ago lol...

    My stress levels were through the roof at the time. I had just moved in to a new home and had been working my ass off selling the old home and building the new one, planning, taking on a bunch of mini projects, etc. Once my stress calmed down, and I went back to a well balanced diet, all issues resolved. Keto in summer for me was a bad idea. While I was going through this last summer, I had a weird attack of some sort that left my heart beating close to 200 BPM, sweating, almost fainted, and had to call ambulance. My blood sugar was 8.0 nmol/L as were my ketones. Still no idea what happened, but since then I'm doing much better.

    My new approach to candida is that sugar is actually a good thing. It is chronic stress that causes the flare-up, because chronic stress = rapid energy (glucose) loss. This disrupts gut flora, and the small amount of candida that lives peacefully in our gut are starved of glucose under chronic stress. Hence they migrate through the GI tract looking for sugar. Once that sugar comes in, they go ape shit to get that sugar, and break through the gut barrier and end up in the bloodstream (i.e. leaky gut). Then you get an autoimmune reaction. The fix (just my theory, IDC who agrees or disagrees) is to manage your stress levels, and don't go low carb like most advocate. The body needs some sugar, so always better to keep diet well balanced (I no longer believe in seasonal eating).
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2017
    Penny likes this.
  7. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    It needs sugar when the sun is strong. 1/3 of our food gives us the electrons we need.......2/3 comes from the the light we expose ourselves too.

    So if it aint the sun and it is man........not good.
    JanSz and kris90 like this.
  8. kris90

    kris90 New Member

    @Jack Kruse, one conclusion I've made based on your teachings, and my own thoughts is that our need to consume food is purely for utilising our "backup" systems so that we can store electrons and light within us to be released at night when the quantum yield is low.

    Therefore, the lower the quantum yield is in our environment, the more energy we need from our backup system for usage when we become disconnected. So basically, in the summer, if you take full advantage of the strong sunlight, you can get by on minimal food, because you are harnessing the sun's energy, but we are more insulin sensitive, so eating even a small amount of food gets stored efficiently so we have energy for the night time fast.

    In winter, we cannot harness that same energy from the sun, so in theory, we become energy deficient in our environment, so we actually rely on our backup system even more. This is where the keto/fasting comes to play to fully rely on the backup system, and increase autophagy so the body can recycle its proteins becoming more energy efficient. BUT, I think the only way to make this work (which we are technically designed for) is to pack on a good amount of fat in the fall. Now my N=1 is that an individual such as myself who chooses to stay lean year round will not do well on a keto diet PERIOD (winter or not), because the body enters true starvation when there is limited endogenous energy substrates (low body fat %). I know it's a mismatch, but who wants to purposely get fat :p Additionally, if we continue to obtain the same energy requirements in winter as summer (i.e. going to work everyday), it only makes sense to me to continue to fuel with carbohydrates, although health may not be as optimal in winter as summer due to the light deficit. Perhaps this can be biohacked.

    My approach is a 40% carb/40% fat/20% protein diet with intermittent fasting year round. Protect against blue light and EMF year round, supplement with UVA light while indoors, supplement with UVB (tanning beds) in winter as well as bright light therapy (light box) on those short, dark days of winter.
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2017
    JanSz likes this.
  9. JanSz

    JanSz Silver

    [qu ote="kris90, post: 212639, member: 19157"]@Jack Kruse, one conclusion I've made based on your teachings, and my own thoughts is that our need to consume food is purely for utilising our "backup" systems so that we can store electrons and light within us to be released at night when the quantum yield is low.

    Therefore, the lower the quantum yield is in our environment, the more energy we need from our backup system for usage when we become disconnected. So basically, in the summer, if you take full advantage of the strong sunlight, you can get by on minimal food, because you are harnessing the sun's energy, but we are more insulin sensitive, so eating even a small amount of food gets stored efficiently so we have energy for the night time fast.

    In winter, we cannot harness that same energy from the sun, so in theory, we become energy deficient in our environment, so we actually rely on our backup system even more. This is where the keto/fasting comes to play to fully rely on the backup system, and increase autophagy so the body can recycle its proteins becoming more energy efficient. BUT, I think the only way to make this work (which we are technically designed for) is to pack on a good amount of fat in the fall. Now my N=1 is that an individual such as myself who chooses to stay lean year round will not do well on a keto diet PERIOD (winter or not), because the body enters true starvation when there is limited endogenous energy substrates (low body fat %). I know it's a mismatch, but who wants to purposely get fat :p Additionally, if we continue to obtain the same energy requirements in winter as summer (i.e. going to work everyday), it only makes sense to me to continue to fuel with carbohydrates, although health may not be as optimal in winter as summer due to the light deficit. Perhaps this can be biohacked.

    My approach is a 40% carb/40% fat/20% protein diet with intermittent fasting year round. Protect against blue light and EMF year round, supplement with UVA light while indoors, supplement with UVB (tanning beds) in winter as well as bright light therapy (light box) on those short, dark days of winter.[/quote]
    ==============================================
    Is Ketosis Safe Long Term?
    [​IMG]
    Eric Berg
  10. kris90

    kris90 New Member

    High insulin does not cause the diseases he thinks. Insulin dysfunction + high sugar in the diet does. High fat diets trigger insulin resistance, because insulin is shut off in the presence of large amounts of fatty acids in the blood. Why? Because when the body burns fatty acids, it is attempting to spare glucose in the blood, and insulin release would be extremely detrimental in this state leading to hypoglycemia. Ketosis = increased gluconeogenesis = high glucagon/low insulin.

    To reverse the insulin resistant state, you break your fast with a large influx of sugar. This stimulates superoxide pulse to turn on insulin signalling and improve insulin sensitivity. To maintain the insulin resistant state, you break your fast with a large influx of fats (i.e. a keto meal). If you mix high fat with high sugar, insulin resistance continues, and blood sugar will be impaired. When this is done chronically, blood sugar remains elevated chronically leading to type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome because blood triglycerides will also be high due to the insulin resistant state. Do people with metabolic syndrome eat too much sugar? Yes. Do they also eat too much fat? Yes. What would happen if they went on a HIGH carb/LOW fat diet? Insulin signalling would turn back on as the fatty acids from the blood get used up, and this person would reverse their metabolic syndrome and/or type 2 diabetes. What would happen if they went on a LOW carb/HIGH fat diet? Their insulin resistance would continue as they fueled themselves with fatty acids, and eventually, blood glucose levels would drop to normal, thus reversing metabolic syndrome and/or type 2 diabetes. Two completely different approaches leading to the same solution.

    "Sugar is a dirty fuel" - then why does the body use glucose as its primary energy source, and fatty acids are the backup fuel? Even in ketosis, the body will not burn solely ketones. It will still produce the glucose we need through gluconeogensis which IS essential for survival.

    I think cyclical ketosis is good. Why? Because it's important for your body to be able to use gluconeogenesis from an evolutionary perspective (i.e. rely on our backup systems when food is not available). We all do it during sleep, and a few extra hours of fasting before or after sleep will help the body get comfortable with this process. After an extended period in this ketogenic/gluconeogenic state, it would be beneficial to provide exogenous glucose to the body via dietary carbohydrates to remind the body that food is available, so we can function the way we need to in a fed state (i.e. reproduction). Our hypothalamtic pituitary gonadal axis (HPGA) is sensitive to glucose status in the body. A large influx of glucose should positively correlate to the GnRH pulses that release our gonadotropins LH and FSH for reproductive function.

    My approach:
    6:00 PM to 12:00 PM - Fasting
    12:00 PM to 5:30 PM - Pseudo-fasting (I eat a small keto meal)
    5:30 PM - 6:00 PM - Large refeed meal containing mostly carbohydrates, with some fats, and remaining protein intake

    Total fasting + pseudofasting (ketosis) = 18 + 5.5 = 23.5 hours

    I only consume carbs once every 23.5 hours. Now I can reap benefits of temporary ketosis, while still consuming 200g of carbs per day (sometimes less sometimes more).
  11. JanSz

    JanSz Silver

    12:00 PM to 5:30 PM - Pseudo-fasting (I eat a small keto meal)
    --------------------------
    How do you eat small keto meal over 5.5 hours
    all at once
    snacking for 5.5 hrs?

    .........................
    what is that keto meal?
    tbsp or two or three or four of fats?
    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    I use butter, coconut oil, macadamian oil, hemp oil but all takes 1-2 minutes to get down 4tbs

    .

    ..............
  12. kris90

    kris90 New Member

    Just 1 meal around 12:00 PM that is around 1/4 to 1/3 of my daily calories. It keeps me full for the 5.5 hours leading up to my dinner feast.

    Keto meal is usually a little more protein than what would be recommended. Usually a few eggs and a good amount of old cheese. Sometimes 1/2 lb of beef with some green veggies. I try to cut back on animal meats lately and get more protein from eggs and dairy (I prefer cheese over milk or yogurt).

    The reason I space out my afternoon meal with dinner so much is so that the fats from my meal can get used up and I'm back to burning my own fat tissue before my feast. I'll typically eat about 3/4 lbs of roasted potatoes in coconut oil, or rice, or pasta with organic baked bread, some sort of meat, and a plate of cooked veggies (in butter). For dessert, it's usually a liberal amount of high quality milk chocolate (lately I've been into swiss Toblerone) or some high quality ice cream with all natural ingredients like haagen dasz.

    We become insulin resistant at night naturally as the body releases fatty acids to prepare for the night time fast. IMO this is the perfect time to eat the majority of your calories, because as long as you are not leptin resistant, you will naturally have a suppressed appetite at night since insulin resistance prevents humans from overeating, thus you eat less than if you ate majority of calories during the day. Atleast that is how my body is responding to this protocol.
  13. Danco3636

    Danco3636 Silver

    Interesting
  14. kris90

    kris90 New Member

    I'm trying to break the myth that excess sugar causes metabolic syndrome and/or type 2 diabetes. If too much sugar in the diet leads to insulin resistance and high blood glucose, then with similar logic, a ketogenic diet should lead to high blood triglycerides but it does not. The body burns anything and everything that contains calories to make ATP. The more sugar you eat, the more sugar you utilize. The more fat you eat, the more fat you utilize. Combining high sugar with high fat in a CALORIC surplus leads to the problems of metabolic syndrome since high fat induces insulin resistance thus inhibiting glucose mobility from blood to tissues.

    If we want a fast metabolism, we need our body to believe there is an abundance of food available. Our brain has a sensor for glucose to be used to determine nutritional status. It just so happens that carbohydrates have the greatest effect on leptin, and leptin is our energy balancing hormone that influences our metabolic rate via signalling thyroid upregulation, thus carbohydrates stimulate this action to the greatest effect. Lack of glucose in the body = starvation. Starvation = ok for fat people, because it'll get rid of their fat. Starvation for lean people = bad or neutral depending on environment. Most live in a suboptimal environment, thus we would be better off to include carbs in the diet to offset the time we are disconnected (i.e. stuck in an office building). If you live pretty much a stress-free life, you could probably pull off keto being lean because you can maximize your autophagy to recycle proteins and become metabolically efficient.

    I don't believe in seasonal eating. The concept of eating is to store energy for when we are disconnected. Eating food is essentially another way of harnessing the sun's energy. All food is made of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen atoms bonds (CHO). Therefore, carbohydrates can become fatty acids, and fatty acids can become carbohydrates. Intermittent fasting is probably the best thing anyone can do to thrive in a modern environment, especially yoking your fast to the day. Most of us wake up early and go to work, and sit in an office for 8 hours. During that time of disconnect, it would be wise to fast, thus stimulating autophagy to recycle our proteins while in a stressful environment. The purpose of the backup system (which is used during fasting) IS when we are disconnected. Breaking the fast at a time when stress level are low will allow for improved digestion and simulation of nutrients. Cortisol has a natural rhythm that peaks in the morning and tapers off in the evening. We are designed to consume most of our food when cortisol levels are low, since cortisol stimulates the use of the backup system by catabolizing our proteins. What you choose to eat to break the fast really does not matter IMO. The brain alone on average uses 120g of glucose per day irregardless of summer or winter.
  15. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    A 70 kg man makes 85 kilograms of ATP per day. That number should astound you. We actually make more ATP than we weigh. This next number is more shocking: Foods are all broken down into electrons that are excited by the sunlight and they are added to mitochondria at our cytochrome proteins. Food can only proved 1/3 of the total amount of ATP we need per day based upon the number of electrons excited by sunlight they possess. If these foods are made by man made light or other genetic methods, (GMO's) the amount of excited electrons is even lower. Fritz Popp was the first reseacher ever to prove that man made food emit less light energy by using photomultipliers in his research.

    What makes the other 2/3 of excited electrons for us? Sunlight does. How does this occur? Red light penetrates our body to effect cytochrome c oxidase which is a red light chromophore. Sunlight contains 42% of IR-A light that is the wireless power company for making the balance of that ATP. Now think about what happens to those ratio's when you stay out of the sun, wear clothes too often, or wear sunscreen. Might you have to eat more to lower the deficit? What happens when this occurs? If you are intrigued by the quantized ideas, you're becoming a mitochondriac.

    Life is all about electrons. In fact valence electrons in all chemicals determines all of our chemical laws and people just glance over this basic fact of life. Biochemistry is all about harvesting the light energy attached to an electron when it is excited by a light source. This is how the photoelectric effect was usupred by cells. Cells are designed to capture the light released from excited electrons as they fall back to the ground state. In this way you begin to see life is a giant Jablonski diagram. The excited electron is called an exciton in quantum systems. In acoustic quantum systems it is called a phonon. Excitation energy transfer and energy migration is the job of the photopigments in living cells.

    Carbs without UV and IR light = metabolic syndrome and T2D. If you don't believe in seasonal eating then you do not understand photosynthesis and how it couples to mitochondria at all. The bottome of the slide lays that relationship out completely

    [​IMG]
  16. kris90

    kris90 New Member

    Hi Jack, I agree with most of what you say, but still not buying the seasonal eating. While it does make sense and is probably the "right" thing to do, society has forced us away from this cyclical pattern: feeding off carbs in summer, fattening up in the fall, hibernating winter, rinse and repeat.

    I don't think mammals fatten in the fall simply due to the consumption of carbs as the light cycles lower. Carbs become fattening when PUFA consumption is high. Mammals consume a high amount of PUFAs in the fall which makes carbs fattening, then consume all the sugary fruits that are in season in the fall and this is the recipe for T2D/metabolic syndrome:

    http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.ca/2017/02/protons-obesity-and-diabetes.html
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18171691

    Eat carbs year round and keep PUFAs low, and you maintain proper insulin signalling, and there is no chance for fat gain if the appropriate food intake is maintained. This is looking at metabolic syndrome from a dietary perspective.

    From an environmental perspective, T2D and metabolic syndrome is likely linked to chronically elevated cortisol levels.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11147291

    Cortisol levels are significantly higher in fall/winter than spring summer. It's likely that as Vitamin D levels fall, cortisol levels rise. When we are required to work 8 hours a day year round, we simply cannot mimic hibernation. That's why IMO, if your lifestyle is summer year round, then you have to biohack your environment and your food to match the requirement. When the quantum yield is low, you rely on the backup system (food) more than ever. Therefore, we should fuel with whatever we can get our hands on, while attempting to minimize cortisol. Technically, we should be able to eat more food in the winter than summer due to the low quantum yield and the need to "supplement" sun's energy. We should be able to eat less the higher our quantum yield is. But fasting in theory should work well year round, because in winter when there is a light deficit, we don't necessarily want our body to rely on food, but use autophagy to recycle proteins to get by on minimal food.

    The standard American diet is one that is loaded with PUFA oils, a high O6 to O3 ratio, and a boatload of sugar on top of it. Basically, the average Joe is signalling their body for hibernation, yet continuing to deliver the same workload year round, and living a disconnected life, in a blue-lit microwaved world. Carbs are a piece of the puzzle, but when you understand everything that's involved in hibernation preparation, you can biohack your carbs, and IMO, they are completely safe if you can properly manipulate your environment.

    My N=1, keto depleted my T levels this winter to that of a neutered kitten. One month of refeeding on carbs (in late winter) and T levels quadrupled.
  17. JanSz

    JanSz Silver

    upload_2017-4-24_8-18-46.png

    We are made of cells.
    There is a volume inside cells and outside cells.
    Cell, mitochondrion, and other cell elements have boundary.
    Those boundaries are made of
    fatty acids
    and
    phospholipids
    upload_2017-4-24_8-30-17.png

    So
    we are made of fats and micronutrients + water

    ..
  18. JanSz

    JanSz Silver

    That part may be or likely is true.
    Problem is
    that many health conscious people load up of fish oils,
    I think eating fish will do the same,
    that
    turns high O6 low O3 ratio
    upside down.
    So many or most health conscious people have too much O3.
    Add to that number of neolithic diseases that among other bad things
    result in
    collection/ accumulation of O3.

    We need campaign to encourage (good) fatty acids analysis.

    ........................................

    Assumption that people are low in O3 is not correct.

    ....
    .
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2017
  19. Danco3636

    Danco3636 Silver

    I agree pretty much with your approach and pretty much have been eating like this for many years now. I just make my food choices are seasonal eating and what should be available during the sun cycles. Those seem to be the best foods that nature provides depending on the light spectrum.
    Though I must say I still stay pretty low carb and fat adapts year round..... It just feels good. Summer time I just thow in some seasonal fruit or tubulars, squash etc and even coconut to keep fat adapted.

    My body and energy seem to run great on fat once the pathways are developed.

    And yep get outside sun and into nature often daily.
  20. kris90

    kris90 New Member

    Nice. I definitely think we need to utilize both systems (glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation). That gives you the best metabolic efficiency. For me, my body loves carbloads at night (just before sunset). It keeps my metabolic rate up and prevents me from getting hypothyroid symptoms, and I wake up insanely lean and dry after a good carbload. I do reefed days weekly once I get below 10% bodyfat, and that keeps my body very happy. Those days will be no fasting, eating frequent high carb/low fat/low protein meals every 2-3 hours while having a relaxing day in the sun.

    I try not to overcomplicate my life in terms of diet and exercise. Maintain balance year round. Get as much time outdoors as possible year round to harness as much energy as I can from the sun. When I'm disconnected during the daytime, I will fast, and let my body catabolize itself. When I'm back in my optimal home environment and I feel my stress levels low, I feel it is an optimal time to feed. I literally get "high" from a big dinner feast, and feel very mindless in the hours leading to bed which is beneficial for my sleep as I shut my mind off, and enter a meditative/sedative state.

    Exercise: 3x per week weights, and as much walking outdoors, minimal clothing in summer. I keep it simple, only 30 min sessions, low reps, low volume, just explosive lifting focusing on slow progressive overload.
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2017

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