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Is menopause a must have in life?

Discussion in 'The New Monster Thread' started by jeanie@truelongmont.com, Apr 18, 2012.

  1. Why menopause? Is it neolithic or?



    Great minds on here have info?
     
  2. Souldanzer

    Souldanzer Banned

    Interesting question.



    I think it happens when a woman runs out of eggs? ... in that case, yep, a must.
     
  3. skline@peak.org

    skline@peak.org New Member

    From what I've read about it, menopause is unique to the human race. Animals just keep on pushing out babies till they drop dead.



    I consider this evolutionary evidence that human women have things more useful to do for the survival and well-being of their immediate groups than just raising the population at the maximum possible speed.



    Personally, I was delighted to stop the cramps, mess, bleeding, and emotional lability. Of course, Doc would probably say that these drawbacks stem from being "neolithic" and he might be right -- still, I think a lot of women feel like menopause is a ticket to freedom of many kinds. The freedom to do what one ought to be doing, what one is truly suited for. The freedom to choose what that is.



    Whatever the purported benefits, no way is anyone going to get me to take enough hormones to start cycling again ...
     
  4. chocolate

    chocolate Silver

    There is an article about reversing menopause. We can grow more eggs.



    http://www.news-medical.net/news/20120409/Eggs-developed-from-stem-cells-could-change-reproductive-technology.aspx



    there are certain receptors on all tissues and organs. The get alarm signals and inflammation signals from the white fat alot. The way my peabrain understands it. The brown stuff needs activated. There are tons of cold rat studies. The study above is about human eggs grown from stem cells on ovaries. Its not donor eggs.



    http://forum.jackkruse.com/showthread.php?1009-Leptin-production-lt-10-BF
     
  5. KiwiLauren

    KiwiLauren Gold

    "Generating an unlimited supply of human eggs and the prospect of reversing menopause was made possible by a series of breakthroughs led by Professor Jonathan Tilly of Harvard"



    Great article and amazing info to think about. I love the line (above) from the article. This is made possible by some guy at Harvard, not our own biology!
     
  6. ColdBren

    ColdBren New Member

    lol....that harvard guy is amazing.
     
  7. Shijin13

    Shijin13 Guest

    Looking at the cycle you have the maiden, mother, crone

    The maiden is the the transition from child to woman at the onset of menses

    Mother is when the woman actually becomes one

    Crone is when the mother no longer can provide the sustenance in the womb or breast and transitions to an elder who helps guide the young women through the stages and supports the tribe w/child care etc. she is the midwife and shaman for the tribe



    As to the physicality of stopping menopause I've never minded TOTM b/c I always too the 1st day for me (when I could swing it). I learned from the onset it was something to cherish for it was special. Given my hormonal craziness. I'd like to keep from loosing the hormones. But when I make the official transition, even if Im still on BHRT I'll wiling enter the circle of crones.
     
  8. chocolate

    chocolate Silver

    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=4&ved=0CEUQFjAD&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.buzzle.com%2Farticles%2Feffects-of-high-altitude-on-the-human-body.html&ei=GHyPT9-gCqbjiAKdy5HuAg&usg=AFQjCNGwQKy_vXuOanizKSpoB5fgcsda4Q&sig2=jGJZPCdQGI5OnV6l1pAjrg

    Effects of High Altitude on the Human Body

    Well all of us have insulin receptor problems, usually from too much iron in the blood apparently. My kid showed elevated risk and her blood work showed it as well. This is supposed to be the cause of macular degeneration and lots of stuff. It is a symptom of high elevations. Increased mitochondria is also. The article is good to read. Just the altitude alone causes a default to ketosis. It doesn't matter what you eat up there,( to a point.)

    Macular degeneration and insulin resistance at low elevations....probably the perfect calibration for high altitude.
     
  9. Glamorama

    Glamorama New Member

    Menopause is natural, but according to Nora G, it shouldn't be as uncomfortable as it is for most woman. She thinks a SAD-diet makes it many times worse than it would have been if we all were born and raised on Paleo cooking. She might have a point, I know I stopped having PMS and severe TOM-symthomps when I started eating Primal.
     
  10. Croak

    Croak New Member

  11. LinD

    LinD New Member

    While inconvenient, I would rather have my monthly cycle than not. At age 50, I am still regular and wonder hire menopause will affect me... My mother died at a young age, and my sister had a hysterectomy at age 40, so no history to pull from.



    Sprint Samsung Epic
     
  12. Owl

    Owl New Member

    So according to Croak's article, pilot and killer whales also go through menopause. If we're descended from the sea, then it looks like it's entirely plausible that menopause is natural and the best thing for our species. Our young take too long to grow up and too many resources for us to be having children in old age.
     
  13. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    great question.......i have my own thoughts but I think this could be a fabulous webinar topic at some point.
     
    digital likes this.



  14. Hehe, not me. I plan on defying gravity.
     
  15. Shijin13

    Shijin13 Guest


    This might explain why I always feel better at altitude, and sleep better at altitude as well.... things to think on....
     
  16. chocolate

    chocolate Silver

    Its awfully hard to build muscle post meno. I am trying to get myself as strong as I can and the keto and cold do it best. Plus, I'm not so thrilled with waning eyesight. I guess the definition of pamper is relevant. I hate being weak and the off being balance that comes from weakness is frightening. I used to work at the airport and the people that pamper themselves are the weakest. You will see an 85 year light bit of fluff walk hard and fast for a distant gate with a wheelchair aide chasing her and the woman crabbing the whole way for them to leave them alone. If its an strong spirited old man (not the same as pushy and demanding) , you have flirt and get edgy to get him to let you "help". Then you'll have very large sixty something couples wanting someone to push the ass they don't even want to haul. I don't want to be those pampered people.

    But on the flip side, the post menopausal skilled and classy are wonderful. I home schooled in LA and had my kids in several parks and rec daytime adult classes. The adults that take those classes in our area are retirees and wonderful. They share and give and enjoy, We were very blessed. The ice rink in the daytime has the same, and you get tons of free lessons from people that actually know what they are talking about. Some of my best mentoring came from college professors that had my elementary aged kids in their classes. They were peeved at first but started coaching me a little when I would hit a wall. They all hit bumps with their kids and would share how to get over them or how they might have done things differently, rethinking. I appreciated it, because I need constructive criticism.

    Glad there wasn't a lipitor ad with the article.
     
  17. Croak

    Croak New Member

    I think the "live long and pamper" was referring to pampering the progeny, not yourself. :)
     
  18. MamaGrok

    MamaGrok New Member

    I don't think menopause = running out of eggs. We're "supposed" to have only a few dozen cycles in our lives, not hundreds. Most of the eggs will go unused in that situation, no?



    I think that menopause has got to be far worse now than it's supposed to be. I know for a fact that cycles are not supposed to be painful, or preceded by hormonal uproar. They're also not supposed to happen for most of our lives. Biologically, they're supposed to start around 15, be followed soon thereafter by a pregnancy, then disappear for 3 years or so till the next one or two cycles are followed by another pregnancy; rinse and repeat for a few decades.



    I don't know when they're "supposed" to end, biologically, though. I'm still looking for data from traditional peoples that shows the typical age of menopause, and duration of perimenopause (which I also suspect is artificially long now).



    Menopause is NOT supposed to be accompanied by hot flashes & hormonal uproar, or followed by a decline in hearing, eyesight, bone composition, etc., etc.



    I read an interesting article in the Price-Pottenger Nutrition Foundation journal that gave a nice explanation of why modern "age-related" decline takes far longer and is far worse than it's supposed to be. Yes, hormones decline with age, but today they decline far too early and far too much.



    I do think menopause is a gift (just as my regular intervals of 3 years without cycles for the last 15 years are a gift), and that the post-menopausal woman should be a gift to the community, not relegated to "irrelevant" status the way she has become post-60's ("Don't trust anyone over 30").
     
  19. kathylu

    kathylu Gold


    Just another N=1, but my mother-in-law didn't stop regular periods until she was 66! She had 7 children, which I'm sure contributed to the late menopause. She has amazing skin and energy and looks far younger than her 80 years.
     

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