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Green Tea to Supercharge Cold Thermogenesis

Discussion in 'Cold Thermogenesis' started by Kasra, Mar 31, 2012.

  1. Kasra

    Kasra New Member

    Hey guys,



    Next time you take a cold shower/bath, try ingesting a good amount of green tea beforehand.



    Yesterday morning, I mixed 4 teaspoons of Matcha into a bottle of ice cold water and chugged it. I felt my body turn into a furnace and was compelled like never before to take an ice cold shower. I will be experimenting more with this.



    The explanation for why this worked is likely that green tea is a potent stimulator of thermogenesis. I'm getting the feeling that this effect largely explains the persistent epidemiological evidence that heavy green tea drinkers live longer.



    I'd like to know what your experience has been with green tea in this context.
     
  2. PaleoMom

    PaleoMom New Member

    I drink white and green tea all day and haven't noticed this effect, but matcha is quite different since you're actually consuming the plant instead of just steeping it.



    I'll join you and pick some up at the store and report back. Thanks for sharing, this could be an exciting bonus!
     
  3. Birdy

    Birdy New Member

    I'll have to try that. I also drink green tea throughout the day and love the way I feel when I have it regularly, decaf or not.
     
  4. JC2K

    JC2K New Member

    Not too keen on that study. They screwed around with Ephedrine and Caffeine in it. Ephedrine/Caffeine stacks are a well known highly thermogenic combination. Essentially what I'm reading that they were saying is that Green Tea alone did little, caffeine alone did little, ephedrine alone did a bit. But green tea + caffeine + ephedrine did a bunch. We already know Ephedrine + caffeine does a bunch. I don't really see anything really thrilling here on green tea alone per se. Really the only thing I'm getting out if it is that if you are drinking green tea alone for thermogenic properties, you want the caffeinated version for the best bang for your buck, and not the decaffeinated version.
     
  5. MamaGrok

    MamaGrok New Member

    So you're saying we should eat tea instead of drink it?
     
  6. Kasra

    Kasra New Member


    You may have misinterpreted the results.



    According to the paper, a small dose of Ephedrine was used "as a pharmacological tool...to mimic a small increase in sympathetic activity."



    Even if you ignore the trials that used Ephedrine, green tea caused a significantly greater increase in brown adipose tissue respiration than did an equal amount of isolated caffeine, suggesting that green tea is a uniquely thermogenic substance.



    This figure clearly illustrates this point (look at the top left graph in particular).
     
  7. Kasra

    Kasra New Member

    @MamaGrok



    This study found that "the concentration of

    epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) available from drinking matcha is ... at least three times higher than the largest literature value for other green teas."



    As you are ingesting the whole leaf, it seems very plausible that you get a substantially stronger dose of catechins in matcha than you would via water extraction (aka brewed tea).



    The original study I linked suggests that the combination of caffeine and EGCG found in green tea is what gives it its thermogenic properties. Thus, matcha should pack more of a thermogenic punch than standard green tea.



    You can also mix matcha with cold water (as I do), making it more convenient to prepare.
     
  8. Kasra

    Kasra New Member


    This study found that "the concentration of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) available from drinking matcha is ... at least three times higher than the largest literature value for other green teas."



    As you are ingesting the whole leaf, it seems very plausible that you get a substantially stronger dose of catechins in matcha than you would via water extraction (aka brewed tea).



    The original study I linked suggests that the combination of caffeine and EGCG found in green tea is what gives it its thermogenic properties. Thus, matcha should pack more of a thermogenic punch than standard green tea.



    You can also mix matcha with cold water (as I do), making it more convenient to prepare.
     
  9. MamaGrok

    MamaGrok New Member

    Are there any cultures that eat green tea, either occasionally, or on a regular basis? I don't eat anything that doesn't have a long history of human use in exactly that way. Look where that got us with soy!
     
  10. Kasra

    Kasra New Member


    Powdered tea was consumed at least as far back as the Tang Dynasty (618-907 AD).



    Just try it yourself. The main reason I'm interested in green tea is that I have actually felt it work.
     
  11. PaleoMom

    PaleoMom New Member


    I believe matcha is the traditional tea for the Japanese tea ceremony, but I can't back that up for sure.
     
  12. janagram

    janagram New Member

    yes, matcha, powdered tea is the traditional tea used in tea ceremony.
     
  13. Jim

    Jim New Member

    Wow. I almost bought some matcha today. As I read the package it talked about pouring the leaves directly into the water which sounded strange to me so I passed on it. I'll have to pick some up and give it a try. I have been cold brewing decaf green tea and drinking it daily. I noticed that I have been very warm lately but I can't say if that was due to my CT sessions or something else.
     
  14. AKMan

    AKMan New Member

    They sell green tea extract capsules. I take 3-4 of them a day, plus a resveratrol capsule. Seems like a good combo with CT.
     
  15. Caroline Cooper

    Caroline Cooper New Member

    I have been drinking matcha daily for over a year. I used it to get off coffee. I do drink it with hot water but you will find you need a matcha whisk. Most of them are made of bamboo. Here is where I get my matcha. A pound for $71.00 is a great price:

    http://www.mountainroseherbs.com/tea_bev/tea_greenwhite.html



    I have not experienced a thermal effect with matcha but it was great for getting off coffee. I am new to CT, in my second week, and I am still very cold with a very low core temperature. My lowest yesterday was 35.2C(95.4F). I can have a low core temperature and not "feel" cold but yesterday I did feel really cold!



    Good luck with your cold thermogenesis.
     
  16. hazyjane

    hazyjane New Member

    Matcha definitely packs a much bigger punch than regular green tea, both in terms of caffeine and theanine. I almost get a "high" from it sometimes, LOL! Because it's powdered, it's a lot more concentrated.
     
  17. hazyjane

    hazyjane New Member


    It's a powder,so you add it to the water and whisk it to mix. I find that a regular small whisk works just fine (you don't need a bamboo tea ceremony whisk).
     
  18. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    i do tons of green tea.....

    and black tea.
     
    Brent Patrick likes this.
  19. Jason Coates

    Jason Coates Losing the Shade.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28275131
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2017 Apr;105(4):873-881. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.116.144972. Epub 2017 Mar 8.Tea catechin and caffeine activate brown adipose tissue and increase cold-induced thermogenic capacity in humans.Background:


    The thermogenic effects of green tea catechin have been repeatedly reported, but their mechanisms are poorly understood.Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the acute and chronic effects of catechin on brown adipose tissue (BAT), a site specialized for nonshivering thermogenesis, in humans.Design: Fifteen healthy male volunteers underwent fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography to assess BAT activity. To examine the acute catechin effect, whole-body energy expenditure (EE) after a single oral ingestion of a beverage containing 615 mg catechin and 77 mg caffeine (catechin beverage) was measured. Next, to investigate the chronic catechin effects, 10 men with low BAT activity were enrolled. Before and after ingestion of the catechin beverage 2 times/d for 5 wk, cold-induced thermogenesis (CIT) after 2 h of cold exposure at 19°C, which is proportional to BAT activity, was examined. Both the acute and chronic trials were single-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, season-matched crossover studies.Results: A single ingestion of the catechin beverage increased EE in 9 subjects who had metabolically active BAT (mean ± SEM: +15.24 ± 1.48 kcal, P < 0.01) but not in 6 subjects who had negligible activities (mean ± SEM: +3.42 ± 2.68 kcal). The ingestion of a placebo beverage containing 82 mg caffeine produced a smaller and comparative EE response in the 2 subject groups. Multivariate regression analysis revealed a significant interaction between BAT and catechin on EE (β = 0.496, P = 0.003). Daily ingestion of the catechin beverage elevated mean ± SEM CIT (from 92.0 ± 26.5 to 197.9 ± 27.7 kcal/d; P = 0.009), whereas the placebo beverage did not change it.Conclusion: Orally ingested tea catechin with caffeine acutely increases EE associated with increased BAT activity and chronically elevates nonshivering CIT, probably because of the recruitment of BAT, in humans. These trials were registered at www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/ as UMIN000016361.
     
  20. Billybats

    Billybats New Member

    I wonder if Dr Kruse still drinks it now. My guess is no.
     
    Nicolaj Sølvsten likes this.

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