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Gagnrad's Journal

Discussion in 'My Optimal Journal' started by Gagnrad, Jan 20, 2014.

  1. Gagnrad

    Gagnrad New Member

    Well, why are you telling me? I just said I wasn't paleo. And even if I were I didn't do the research. Hadn't you better tell Cordain what you've found out? Here he is:

    http://thepaleodiet.com/contact-us/
     
  2. Gagnrad

    Gagnrad New Member

    Crushed Under the Weight of Sugar

    Here's another podcast from Vinnie Tortorich that's worth listening to:

    http://vinnietortorich.com/2015/09/how-eating-less-hurts/

    It's worth it for the extensive quotes from a Gary Taubes' New York Times article on Ancel Keys wartime "starvation-diet" experiments alone. But even better is Vinnie's heartfelt description of obese fellow-passengers on a New Orleans–Los Angeles flight. Vinnie has his faults. He's sometimes not accurate as regards the scientific details of his statements, and he definitely couldn't be played in front of children; but he knows his own area (sport and fitness) and he clearly does care. You can't fake this. These are people who have been comprehensively let down by the dietary establishment, the USDA, the ADA, and all the other members of the alphabet soup mafia.
     
  3. b612

    b612 New Member

    Probably I should.... :thumbsdown:
     
  4. Gagnrad

    Gagnrad New Member

    Good. Let me know what he says.
     
  5. Gagnrad

    Gagnrad New Member

    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2015-09/osu-bia092815.php
     
  6. b612

    b612 New Member

    I just got inspired to create a poem. Never happened before.
    A poem called "paleo forum"
     
  7. Gagnrad

    Gagnrad New Member

    A friend tells me that berberine is the anti-antibiotic. What I think this probably means is that she's seen some data that suggest that it helps beneficial gut bacteria to flourish (presumably by killing less helpful ones, as some herbs will). Antibiotics can, of course, be useful, but they do tend to kill off what would have been better left alone along with what they're aimed at. And in this way they make space for overgrowths that we could do without. So anything that would, or might in some cases, reverse that effect would obviously be a good thing. I know that berberine has long been touted as useful for stabilising bloodsugar (and I think it has an ancient history in this role). I don't know what its mechanism of action is thought to be, but perhaps the improvements in insulin sensitivity it brings might be mediated by an effect on the microbiome.


    Floramend looks like an interesting probiotic:

    http://uk.iherb.com/Thorne-Research...e-Caps/41208?gclid=CK-8gPOAq8gCFeOD2wodR0AJ9w
    This one has less strains of bacteria than some (compare Bio-Kult recommended by the GAPS people and originally developed in consultation with Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride) but is high-potency. Floramend has three strains in it, including the vitally important Bifidobacterium longum, which, I believe, one should get at birth and keep, but which some of us are careless enough to lose. (Spot the reference to Mr. Worthing there. And come to think of it, the capsules could be kept in a handbag. "A handbag!") The coating on these capsules is also supposed to be proof against stomach acid, so the capsule doesn't open too soon. But then some probiotics are supplied as powders and seem to work. The Floramend does not have to be kept refrigerated.
    It seems likely that a healthy microbiome is highly diverse. (This isn't certain, and people have argued otherwise, but that's the most common opinion currently, and the greater microbial diversity found in populations that have not been exposed to antibiotics, and other disrupters, supports that view.) It's also thought that, as with ecosystems, certain species are keystone species. Some do appear to have very special roles, and some while not numerous are associated with a good state of health. (Compare how very small numbers of a predator introduced into an ecosystem can improve its overall functioning by keeping a prey animal that's, for example, overgrazing withing bounds, or how a few wolves can stop a coyote population from exploding.) One example might be Akkermansia municiphila. That seems to have a symbiotic role: it feeds on mucus and, as it were, in exchange helps to keep down opportunistic pathogens. The Ireland rugby team had their microbiomes sequenced a while ago. They tended to have higher levels than the general population of some of these important symbionts, such as Akkermansia. Akkermansia has been found to be very low or absent in samples of some populations, such as the obese and diabetics. Akkermansia, by the way, can be helped by eating some specific foods, such as pomegranate seeds, but you have to have a viable population there to be helped in the first place.
     
  8. Gagnrad

    Gagnrad New Member

    Perhaps I should have waited for some snow before posting this one. :)


    Robert Frost
    Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

    Whose woods these are I think I know.
    His house is in the village though;
    He will not see me stopping here
    To watch his woods fill up with snow.
    My little horse must think it queer
    To stop without a farmhouse near
    Between the woods and frozen lake
    The darkest evening of the year.
    He gives his harness bells a shake
    To ask if there is some mistake.
    The only other sound’s the sweep
    Of easy wind and downy flake.
    The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
    But I have promises to keep,
    And miles to go before I sleep,
    And miles to go before I sleep.
     
    b612 likes this.
  9. Gagnrad

    Gagnrad New Member

    I've been listening to the Odyssey on audiobook (Robert Fitzgerald translation). I must have read it half a dozen times, but it's a long time since I last read it.

    I was just thinking - doesn't Whitney Houston look like she's wearing something Ancient Greek in this shot (see upload)? I think so.

    And while were about it here she is singing a number off that album:



    But anyway … I think I could have seen her in a Hollywood version of the Odyssey. Maybe she would have been Circe - or the nymph Calypso.

    I wonder who could have played Odysseus well. I'm thinking maybe Liam Neeson could have. But I'm lost for Athene and Penelope and Telemachus. Maybe Ray Winston as Polyphemus the cyclops … or how about James Earl Jones, who can sound pretty sinister when he wants to?
     

    Attached Files:

  10. Gagnrad

    Gagnrad New Member

  11. Gagnrad

    Gagnrad New Member

  12. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    We've lost those three too...........
     
  13. Gagnrad

    Gagnrad New Member

    LOL. AFAICT, "sun" and "light" are actually synonymous here.

    Let me guess: what we had was sunlight, water, and the earth's magnetic field.

    We "lost" those three. We lost the first because we stay indoors most of the day. See, for example, Drummond (key figure also in the early biochemical work on vitamins and a hero of Michael Crawford's, who was taught by him. Crawford, as far as I can gather, thinks Drummond was murdered for political reasons. Maybe he's right.)

    Drummond's magnum opus:

    http://www.amazon.com/Englishmans-Food-Centuries-6-Oct-1994-Paperback/dp/B012HUCH60/

    (Drummond's an interesting character, and there are some interesting questions around his death, as Tim Noakes, as well as Crawford, has remarked. See also: http://www.amazon.com/Vitamin-Murders-Killed-Healthy-Britain/dp/1846270146/ )

    I wandered … we lost the second, because our water is polluted. In some jurisdictions it's deliberately seeded with fluoride, because "clever" people got stupid (or corrupt) politicians to think (or say) that was a good idea when the real truth was that companies had fluoride compounds they wanted to sell on rather than dispose of at a cost.

    We lost the third, because we sleep upstairs and even work in multi-storey buildings.

    It's a bummer. At this point, what can we do?
     
  14. notsoperfick

    notsoperfick New Member

    That video, ugh, some people have a lot to learn, already fat baby encouraged to eat sugar etc. Horrified me to be honest.

    "Imagine that meds didn't exist... What would you do with your thyroid?"
    I'm supposing here that maybe back in paleo times there weren't the thyroid problems to the degree there are now?

    Gosh, Drummond's end was sure dramatic, similar to that family killed in France a couple of years ago by some unknown assassin. His book is a tad expensive but I'd bet it's an interesting read, for those with enough knowledge to follow it if it's very academic.

    In the north west our water is not fluoridised thank goodness. They are very heavy handed with chlorine though, you can smell it when you turn on the tap. I've used water filtration for nearly 30 years, I wish we had a well!

    "At this point, what can we do?" I can only suggest wild camping, in a warm country by an unpolluted lake or river, fancy trying it :rolleyes:?
     
  15. Gagnrad

    Gagnrad New Member

  16. Gagnrad

    Gagnrad New Member

    Yup. I'd like to hear Vinnie Tortorich going OTT on that. Vinnie has a filthy mouth, but he can be very funny and he has a good line in outrage:

    http://vinnietortorich.com/

    My thought, too. I think as problems arise people find ways to deal with them. C.f. Dentists. No one needed them till they needed them, but then they did ... Weston Price is very good on this.

    No, it's written for a general audience. Tim Noakes is a big fan of Drummond, BTW. The interesting book is the book about the murder, though. Everyone should read that. Go on: get a copy. It's only a penny secondhand. What's to lose?

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Vitamin-Murders-Killed-Healthy-Britain/dp/1846270146/

    The question is who carried the murder out. The public answer is "crazy backward French peasant". The "conspiracy" answer is "secret service assassination". AFAICT, Professor Michael Crawford thinks the latter. Tim Noakes gives the impression he does, too. I don't know. Maybe. There is stuff that points that way. Drummond was definitely working for British Intelligence in some capacity. And there are witness statements regarding people asking about his movements and evidently following him. There's also a tale of some curiously "missing" documents connected with the case.

    And this is all tied up with the explosion in chemical agriculture after the war and with a French Plant that was doing that stuff. Furthermore, some of these chemicals are a bit double-use: they started life as chemical weapons and were later re-purposed as pesticides. (Straight up. Robb Wolf recently commented on this in a podcast.) So, yeah, intelligence agencies could have been interested in what Drummond was up to.

    Maybe the Soviets rubbed him out. Or maybe he annoyed British - or French - Intelligence in some way. But maybe it really was just a French peasant. Who could tell at this distance in time?

    Same here. Ozone would be better, but AFAIK companies that use that generally use chlorine as well and the combination causes further problems. Oh, dear ...

    Well, golly, I hope you didn't mean the "we" in one sense it could have: I think I'd better leave married women alone. ;) :rofl:
     
  17. Gagnrad

    Gagnrad New Member

  18. Gagnrad

    Gagnrad New Member

    Anyone come across this?

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Secrets-Aboriginal-Healing-Physicists-Australian/dp/1591431751/


    I think trying to pair the word "physicist" with ancient beliefs and practices has been a sure seller ever since this book:

    http://www.amazon.com/Dancing-Wu-Li-Masters-Overview/dp/0060959681/

    And, sure, if one avoids being too specific it's always possible to "find" parallels between just about anything and just about anything else. (I think there's a quip from Nietzsche somewhere about archaeologists who find what they previously buried.)

    Still and all … if he did arrive in the Outback quadriplegic but walked out there's perhaps something interesting going on.
     
  19. notsoperfick

    notsoperfick New Member

    "perhaps the cat got in there by itself:"
    I could almost guarantee it, cats and boxes, irresistible urge to explore. If you've never watched the videos of Maru you should, here's a starter:
     
  20. Gagnrad

    Gagnrad New Member

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