1. Registering for the Forum

    We require a human profile pic upon registration on this forum.

    After registration is submitted, you will receive a confirmation email, which should contain a link to confirm your intent to register for the forum. At this point, you will not yet be registered on the forum.

    Our Support staff will manually approve your account within 24 hours, and you will get a notification. This is to prevent the many spam account signups which we receive on a daily basis.

    If you have any problems completing this registration, please email support@jackkruse.com and we will assist you.

Factor X Smoking Gun--Myelination

Discussion in 'Factor X' started by AKMan, Sep 25, 2012.

  1. AKMan

    AKMan New Member

    Jack talks about this quite frequently. This study examined differences in primates and humans concerning brain development. So much for us being 99% identical!



    A mixed background group of US researchers has found in studying chimpanzee brains, that development of myelin, the fatty sheath that covers the connections between nerve cells, occurs at a different rate than for humans, and as they write in their paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the differences might account for the greater instance of mental disorders in people than in both chimpanzees and other primates, such as macaques.





    http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-09-myelin-differences-chimps-humans.html



    Human babies are born with almost no myelin at all. Shortly after birth, they have a spurt of sorts, with a lot of developing occurring and continuing on slowly thereafter for some thirty years. Other primates, in contrast, begin developing myelin while still in the womb and it keeps up just until the animal reaches sexual maturity, at which point, it stops completely.



    The researchers speculate that the differences in myelin development may explain some of the unique mental abilities of people, as being born with little to no myelin, allows for more openness to learning from the environment as opposed to relying on information passed on through genes. They also suggest those same differences might be putting people at more of a risk of developing mental illness though, as the possibility of something going wrong during the process grows greater over longer periods of time.
     
  2. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    BG 13 hits this........
     
  3. Marccus

    Marccus New Member

    Broken link by you do you have any6 suitable link for this purpose where i can look for more information
     

Share This Page