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Excessive sweating

Discussion in 'Biohacking 101' started by CoE, Sep 20, 2019.

  1. CoE

    CoE New Member

    Hi everyone,

    i wanted to know if some people here actually cured their hyperhidrosis or their sweating problems and what they did to achieve it. I found some threads about people asking for help, but actually don't know, if they cured themselves or how long it took them. From the answers of Jack i know that everything comes down to the autonomic nervous system and/or a conncetion to DHA, the thyroid and inflammation. So obviously the leptinrx and the according diet are the way to go. But i would still love to hear about some personal experiences and also some other tips when it comes to reducing sweating because sadly it wipes out a little of the fun with sommer for me and really reduces my quality of life.

    To give a short insight in my personal history with hyperhidrosis: Mine started so noticeably that i can pinpoint the day it started. When i came back from a vacation in Spain beeing 17 years old, i found myself profusely sweating, while beeing in the sun in Germany. It got wore when we were going out later that day. I mean profusely because it is basicly all over my body and the amount is way too much. Not only some little underarm sweat stains. At first i thought it is only something like a regulation problem to the wheather. But 13 years later it never went away (i am 30 now). Whenever it gets warm or my bodytemperature rises i sweat on my whole upper body. I say that because during sports i also sweat like a mad man. This is also interesting because i am pretty fit i would say, but the slightest movement, which should not be exhausting, will definatly worsen my sweat situation. I can also manage to sweat in the winter if i dare to put too many clothes on to keep me warm. Wearing something light colored is out of the question for me, because it would turn dark colored in no time during sommer. I would also say that i don't freeze early and am much more capable of tolerating the cold than warm environments.
    I am a big fan of Jacks work and pretty glad i found the book and all the info on the blog. For me the whole experience with the leptinrx and diet just started a few days ago. So of course it is way to early to notice any changes yet. Obviously i will keep on going and maybe i can post some results then :).

    Things to consider/ things i tried:
    - i am hypothyroid - I tried a lot with my medication and at least didn't see any changes with sweating. Lab tests where "good". Also t4/t3 was tested.
    - experimented with magnesium supps but it didn't help
    - tried going to the sauna for over a year to somehow adapt to the heat
    - cold showers help for a few minutes after getting out and really "bring me down". They get me a little relief so i finally feel really cold which is also not so common. I have to restart that and i am slowly easing in.
    - experiemented with the amount of water i drink, because a doc once told me i might drink way to much. It didn't help though.
    - tried meditating. Still do it ocasionally. I wouldn't say i am a nervous type, also i somehow accepted that i sweat way too much. I know that a lot of people say they sweat because of beeing nervous. I think for myself it is not "that easy".
    - tried the Wim Hof breathing method. Was not consistent with it, but will definatly ramp it up again.

    Thank you all for reading. Cheers ;)
     
  2. JanSz

    JanSz Gold

    Hopefully it is interesting enough for the @Jack Kruse that he would enlighten us on this subject.
    -------------------------------------------------
    Just guessing, hyperhidrosis
    it is not connected to
    Steroid hormone panel
    Thyroid hormone panel
    Growth hormone panel

    Likely have to do with work of kidneys and vassopressin (ADH)
    ---------------------
    I am picking ADH because:

    Prescription medications called anticholinergics, often taken by mouth, are sometimes used in the treatment of both generalized and focal hyperhidrosis.[13]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperhidrosis#Treatment
    Several anticholinergic drugs can reduce hyperhidrosis. Oxybutynin (brand name Ditropan) is one that has shown promise,[12][15] although it can have side-effects, such as drowsiness, visual symptoms and dryness of the mouth and other mucous membranes. Glycopyrrolate is another drug sometimes used. It is said to be nearly as effective as oxybutynin, but has similar side-effects. In 2018, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a glycopyrronium bromide-containing disposable cloth (brand name Qbrexza) for the treatment of primary axillary hyperhidrosis.[16]
    ===========================================
    An anticholinergic agent is a substance that blocks the action of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine at synapses in the central and the peripheral nervous system.[1] These agents inhibit parasympathetic nerve impulses by selectively blocking the binding of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine to its receptor in nerve cells. The nerve fibers of the parasympathetic system are responsible for the involuntary movement of smooth muscles present in the gastrointestinal tract, urinary tract, lungs, and many other parts of the body. Anticholinergics are divided into three categories in accordance with their specific targets in the central and peripheral nervous system: antimuscarinic agents, ganglionic blockers, and neuromuscular blockers.[2]

    ...........................
     
    CoE likes this.
  3. JanSz

    JanSz Gold

    @CoE
    webinar is coming
    make that your question

    Birthday:May 4, 1988 (Age: 31)
    upload_2019-9-20_14-19-38.png
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2019
    CoE likes this.
  4. JanSz

    JanSz Gold

    There are two schools on drinking. Try both, pick the one that works better for you.
    @Jack Kruse ----->>drink a lot of good water, not much interest in deuterium content lot=2 gallons

    Dr Boros ---->drink only when (really, really, really) thirsty, at this (small) quantities likely it does not matter what deuterium content there is,
    but make sure that you eat enough foods that contain lots of oleic acid.
    pigs lard
    fat bacon
    olive oil
    avocado oil


    ....
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2019
    CoE likes this.
  5. JanSz

    JanSz Gold

    You look very fit.
    Wonder what you would show up on oleic acid test.
    If you would go in that direction, get this two tests:

    Spectracell.com
    Micronutrient analysis

    Labcorp.com
    Fatty Acid Profile, Comprehensive (C8-C26), Serum


    .......
     
    CoE likes this.
  6. CoE

    CoE New Member

    Thanks for the reply and the input. Much appreciated!

    Yeah i read about Ditropan. But the link to kidneys and vassopressin wasn't so obvious for me. Now that you mention it, that is super interesing. The input on water and hydration is also pretty interesting. I will try to change that a little so i might see a change.
    Ha, ha yeah on the picture i "was" fit , but the picture was 3 Years ago and currently i am fighting off a back injury, but i will get back there somewhen.

    I had some blood work done last year. I might find the results and will post them here if i can find them. I sadly cannot come back to the providers you mentioned, because i live in Germany. Of course i might focus on something comparable, especially if i know in which direction i can move forward.
     
  7. MITpowered26

    MITpowered26 New Member

    As a temporary stop gap, you could try transdermal glycopyrrolate + tea tree oil in cream base. I don't know if its sweat + odour, or just sweat, but the combination hits it from both angles, which feed into each other. Covered by some insurance plans, at least where I am.
     
  8. JanSz

    JanSz Gold

    @CoE
    @MITpowered26 is a pharmacist (I think). Possibly he may come with other ideas.
    Thank you MITpowered26

    .
     
  9. JanSz

    JanSz Gold

    Fatty Acid Profile, Comprehensive (C8-C26), Serum
    Should be available everywhere.

    Call spectracell, at one time they had places to take blood for their tests in London and somewhere is Switzerland.

    .....
     
  10. MITpowered26

    MITpowered26 New Member

    @CoE @JanSz

    I prefer the title quantum compounding pharmacist. :)

    your issue is full body, so this option is not ideal, but maybe its a soft on ramp, instead of going straight to glyco capsules.. hope you figure out the quantum answer. :)
     
  11. JanSz

    JanSz Gold

    Compounding pharmacists are close to a lost art.
    Sometimes they are getting a bad rap, would not be surprised if it was BigPharma arranged.

    .
     
    MITpowered26 likes this.
  12. MITpowered26

    MITpowered26 New Member

    Don't need to be surprised any longer :)

    The positive is this: you cannot scale an individualized medicine approach such as compounding. Nor is there money to patent every single damn drug combination and drug strength combination. Advantages for us independent compounders over corp.
     
    JanSz likes this.
  13. JanSz

    JanSz Gold

    If you had to make compounded topical testosterone, today, what kind of base would you use and what testosterone strength?
    Assume that you have to provide educated suggestions to the doctor who is about to write the script.

    ..
     
    MITpowered26 likes this.
  14. MITpowered26

    MITpowered26 New Member

    Pcca atrevis gel for males
    Pcca versabase cream for females

    Strength is patient specific.

    I can prescribe almost anything where I am. Im grateful that It’s the most progressive region for pharmacists on the globe.
     
  15. JanSz

    JanSz Gold

    thanks
    .
     
    MITpowered26 likes this.
  16. MITpowered26

    MITpowered26 New Member

    The honest truth? Jack is 100% correct. It’s made endogenously and I prefer patients to not use it exogenously..especially in high doses.. people get addicted to chasing the artificial “high”
     
  17. JanSz

    JanSz Gold

    Say you have in front of you male with Primary hypogonadism, would you still hold this opinion?
    .
     
    MITpowered26 likes this.
  18. MITpowered26

    MITpowered26 New Member

    Ideally, yes.

    First I must preface. I am not a physician, let alone an endocrinologist, let alone someone versed (yet) in quantum biology. However, when I do assess and prescribe, I never do it as a silo. I always bounce ideas off respected colleagues, mentors, etc, as I believe everyone has blind spots. I have many.

    Having said that..here is my attempt at a well rounded response:

    I try not get caught up in diagnoses, nor (most) labs as my fundamental approach to a patient. It's about context, the patients evolving goals, their symptoms and experiences. If the patient is showing signs or symptoms that concern the patient/care team, then testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) can be considered, but again, it's not cut and dry. How is their overall functioning? What risks (eg TRT sensitivity, hematocrit issues, prostate pathology), and benefits (intelligence, muscle mass/bone health, psycho-sexual functioning). Early or later onset?

    The diagnosis. Is there a known cause found in the history (trauma, radiation, genetics)? Is this a partial hypogonadism? Is it mixed primary/secondary? Is it reversible based on the information?

    Cortisol, yes, you need to survive. Testosterone.. I don't think you do.. but are you thriving, are you optimal, that is the question. It just depends.

    Testosterone replacement. the pharacokinetics (absorption, distribution, elimination) and pharmacodynamics (effects, side effects) can be tricky in which poison you pick, as well as the personality of the patient (addictive).

    If the quantum biology is optimized,first and foremost, and the dose doesn't reach obscene supraphysiologic levels, and the right route is used in the right way, and patient monitoring is done, and there is subjective benefit, then I'm cool with. Again, not my optimal choice though.

    Someone destroy me if I"m out to lunch here @Jack Kruse but that's my point of view right now.

    J
     
  19. JanSz

    JanSz Gold

    I am not a doctor and newer formally studied anything related to medicine.
    I like you, but I feel that you may (still) be under too much influence of BigPharma, likely without realizing it.

    I decided to see only the best.
    My case was so bad that my doctor, currently (September 2019, that is 22 years later) who still is
    Director of Male Sexual and Reproductive Medicine Program (hospital in Manhattan NYC)
    told me (in about 1997) that for me it is about time to pack up, the end is near; I should relax and enjoy what I have left of my life.
    He can't do anything for me.

    In retrospect, he did me a big favor.
    As a thank you, when I have a chance, I will screw his wife while he will be watching.
    But supplemental testosterone is what I need, among a number of other things (that I figured myself).

    .....
     
    MITpowered26 likes this.
  20. MITpowered26

    MITpowered26 New Member

    Explain.
     

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