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Eating RAW fish from your own freezer?

Discussion in 'Beginners Area' started by lilreddgirl, Jan 7, 2016.

  1. lilreddgirl

    lilreddgirl New Member

    Is anyone here eating their fish raw?

    Are you buying it frozen and then thawing it out ?

    I eat sushi and sashimi when out, but because I've never done it at home I feel hesitant to eat the fish raw from my own freezer. I've been reading online and am concerned about parasites...

    I'm buying supermarket salmon that has already been cut and vacuum sealed. It's in my freezer which says that the temperature is -6 Farenheit.

    Is this safe to thaw and eat raw? Is anyone else doing this? Are parasites a concern?
     
  2. cygnario

    cygnario Gold

    For me, I've always eaten most of my fish either raw or smoked/fermented, never had any problems.
    I really think raw is the way to go, also keeps the most important nutrients intact.
     
    lilreddgirl likes this.
  3. Inger

    Inger Silver

    Well I do it all the time... freezed or not.... I enjoy it ;)
     
    lilreddgirl likes this.
  4. fitness@home

    fitness@home Silver

    I have eaten fish from my freezer that's been thawed many times.

    Whether you eat raw fish at home or at a restaurant there is always going to be a chance of parasites.

    The parasite thing...if your stomach acids are strong enough it shouldn't be an issue. It was one of my questions in a consult with Tim Jackson.
     
    lilreddgirl and Martin like this.
  5. Martin

    Martin Gold

    I was going to answer the same way. I LOVE my wild salmon warmed up with water - very mild and sweet tasting. Some capers... then down the hatch with betaine HCL caps.

    Martin
     
  6. lilreddgirl

    lilreddgirl New Member

    Thank you for the answers!

    I'm going to try it :) I love raw sashimi when out... so now I'll get to have my own...
     
  7. TerrierMom

    TerrierMom Gold

    My understanding is that freezing kills the parasites. I am moving to a raw diet for dogs and the the PaleoPet vet that I see (he has a great book too, you can find it on Amazon, Dr Coghlan), in his book he says always freeze the meat you get for them and thaw it, to protect from parasites....seeems as though it should work for us too. There are countries where they are never allowed to serve fish raw that has not been frozen and thawed (Canada, for example, last time I was there anyway). And I believe it is for this reason..... I eat tons of sashimi. I also can buy "sashimi grade" fish at the local Asian markets (gotta love southern CA for those markets alone), but honestly am not sure what the difference is between that and regular fish.
     
    lilreddgirl likes this.
  8. TerrierMom

    TerrierMom Gold

    Here's some info : For fish that contain parasites, the FDA provides guidance under their Parasite Destruction Guarantee. This states in part that fish intended to be consumed raw must be “frozen and stored at a temperature of -20°C (-4°F) or below for a minimum of 168 hours (7 days)”. So.... hope that helps.
     
    lilreddgirl likes this.
  9. SandyD

    SandyD New Member

    Perhaps this is the reason I don't get food poisoning from bought sashimi, but I get it from anything else raw, with regards to HCL, is this something one needs to do all the time? Or would the body heal the HCL levels increases gradually and one can come off them? I don't want to be relying on HCL for a prolonged period of time.
     

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