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ATP question

Discussion in 'Ask Jack' started by Stephen W, Feb 15, 2020.

  1. Stephen W

    Stephen W Silver

    Hi Jack,
    Can enough ATP be produced within 10 min of standing in the sun to feel a difference?

    My symptoms go away with warm sun within 10 min or so and made me wonder if it’s ATP and that being my problem.

    Thanks
     
    DrEttinger likes this.
  2. DrEttinger

    DrEttinger Choice, the only thing we control

    Stephen,

    This is a good read and may shed some light on what's going on.

    How UV Light Touches the Brain and Endocrine System Through Skin, and Why

    First paragraph of the conclusion:

    Because UV energy has shaped both biological evolution and homeostatic responses, it is not surprising that UV regulates global homeostasis after absorption and transduction of its electromagnetic energy into chemical, hormonal, and neural signals in a wavelength-dependent fashion, defined by its tissue penetration and the nature of the chromophores UVR interacts with. This homeostatic activity includes activation of the CNS and/or endocrine glands through neural transmission or chemical messengers originating in the skin. This type of regulation, although representing relics from earlier periods of biological evolution, follows precise neuroendocrine regulatory mechanisms of which examples are represented by HPA, CRH-POMC, opioidogenic, serotonin/melatoninergic, secosteroid/steroidogenic, or NO systems.
     
    JanSz and Stephen W like this.

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