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are your yellow tinted glasses sufficient? a simple test to find out.

Discussion in 'Cold Thermogenesis' started by Entelechy, May 2, 2012.

  1. Entelechy

    Entelechy New Member

    Hi all. I had a pair of deep yellow glasses that I "thought" would be sufficient to block out the offending blue light that activates the melanopsin receptors.

    I had the chance to test them, and I was wrong, they only blocked light below about 450nm.

    Melanopsin receptors are most sensitive between 460-480nm, and it's imperitive that this range of wavelengths be blocked. Some studies show that the SCN is reset by higher wavelengths, even up to 520nm and above if the intensity is bright enough, but for our purposes (dim lighting) the 480nm should be our cutoff.



    how do we measure what our glasses are doing?

    can I test/check those sunglasses before I buy?

    easily!

    all you need is a CD/DVD and a compact fluorescent light source.

    It's best to be in a dark room with a single light source, tilt the cd until you can see the broken 'rainbow'



    because compact fluorescents don't have an even distribution of the entire visible spectrum, it make's it quite easy to see 'where we are' in the spectrum.



    while looking at the blue smudge at 487.7 nm , put on the glasses and it should entirely disappear. My yellow tinted ones blocked out the purple spike at 436.6nm but only reduced intensity of the 487nm peak by about 50%.



    my amber tinted lenses, block it completely.

    once you get the hang of looking at the compact fluorescent spectrum, you can tell even in a full spectrum rainbow what area you want to see blocked.
     
  2. LinD

    LinD New Member

    Very cool and good to know. Thank you.



    Sprint Samsung Epic
     
  3. donkjellberg

    donkjellberg Silver

    I don't know. I have amber glasses and Oakley. Both are porported to block blue light. I can see the light on the CD although some of the blue spectrum appears to be cancelled out by the amber lens the blue may be just the complementary color making it appear to disappear. Not sure if blue light is genuinely blocked by any lens yet. Still looking for research . . . .
     
  4. Entelechy

    Entelechy New Member

    "blue light blocking" is pretty vague. There are ANSI standards though, setting limits on photopic vs scotopic light transmission at various wavelengths.

    If you are having trouble finding research, I can direct you to literally hundreds of papers.



    check out Uvex SCT Orange. Uvex safety glasses, "spectrum control technology orange" glasses are made for dental workers, working with blue curing lights. They have a charts on their website showing the steep cut off at about 500nm, and a transmittance of > 75% photopically. Their Espresso lens is also > 95% blocking at 500nm and is great sunglass lense. Just going by memory here. I'll see what I can dig up when I get back.

    cheers.
     
  5. villjamur_stevenson

    villjamur_stevenson New Member

    So what is your plan with these? Do you just basically wear then after sunset?
     
  6. kathylu

    kathylu Gold

    I put them on at sunset and wear them until I go to bed.
     
  7. MJ*

    MJ* New Member

  8. nonchalant

    nonchalant Silver

    I bought a second pair of Uvex SCT goggles recently. I can tell they work because I start yawning within an hour of putting them on. And I can tell that some light is noticably shifted, and some led's disappear entirely. I'll try your CD test tonight! Thanks, Entelechy.
     
  9. MJ*

    MJ* New Member

    Wow that's something that it makes you sleepy...
     
  10. nonchalant

    nonchalant Silver

    Hi MJ. Yeah, when I got the first pair in March, it would get dark much earlier at night. I'd find myself yawning at 7ish! Crazy!

    Since it's May, I'll see it's getting dark outside, check the time, and find that it is almost time for bed already. So I don't use them as long now, maybe an hour or so. And I don't need them in the morning, since it gets light out so early now.
     
  11. donkjellberg

    donkjellberg Silver

    I wear Oakleys but they do not block the prism reflection from a CD. That was the point of my confusion. That is what I am having trouble with, linking practical tests with research.



    I can see all the spectrum reflected on the CDs with or without either my amber glasses or Oakleys. The amber do block a little better but that may be due in part to complementary colors similar to the effect of green and blue (scrubs and walls) in an operating room.



    Oakleys do not block the visible light on the CD but are described to block blue light up to 400nm, even with clear lens. They do help me sleep better at night and I wear them at work in a hospital @ 9 until I am in bed in the dark. I have done this for two weeks and I sleep much better getting tired earlier and my nocturnal urination has also stopped. Not sure if this is a placebo effect. I have learned to be skeptical about much recently and this is just another example of my wait and see until convinced attitude.
     
  12. MJ*

    MJ* New Member

    It's great, but I am wondering am I going to become boring at parties? LOL!
     
  13. MJ*

    MJ* New Member

    I hope that's true, I'm going to get them for my husband...he can't drink anything after a certain hour or he wakes up to go to the bathroom - it definitely interrupts his sleep!
     
  14. donkjellberg

    donkjellberg Silver


    I can do this without much concern these days. I use to avoid drinking like the plague at night. Last night just before falling asleep I downed nearly a whole bottle of Pelegrino (the larger one) and slept like a baby all night.
     
  15. Shijin13

    Shijin13 Guest

    I've got the uvex blue light blockers...just put them on... can't see any blue light at all on the links OP provided.. they rock.. since wearing them for over a month I've actually kicked the melatonin to the curb...don't need it to fall asleep!
     
  16. MJ*

    MJ* New Member

    That's fantastic! I'm going to put in an order now!
     
  17. MJ*

    MJ* New Member

    Do you have a link for those? Or are those the ones I linked to?
     
  18. Shijin13

    Shijin13 Guest

  19. MJ*

    MJ* New Member

  20. ChimpChick

    ChimpChick New Member

    I have them too! Hubbs and I look like senior citizens at night!
     

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