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A little story about Infrared and CT

Discussion in 'The New Monster Thread' started by bionaut, Feb 8, 2014.

  1. yewwei.tan

    yewwei.tan Gold

    Now this is definitely getting interesting :D

    Cr(VI) inhibited basically everything regarding mitochondrial function. All complexes were shut down -- http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11979422

    Another paper showing 40% drop in mitochondrial NADH levels upon addition of Cr(VI). I don't know exactly what this means (oxidising NADH gives us NAD+ right?) -- http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2369782

    Another paper 'Hyperketonemia decreases mitochondrial membrane potential and its normalization with chromium (III) supplementation in monocytes.' -- http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21153866 .

    We already know that ketosis reduces delta psi, which is part of the reason why you need to become more insulin resistant (less reverse electron flow through Complex I). Cr3+ is insulin sensitising by keeping membrane potential high.

    Now how does this relate to ketosis-obsessed Jimmy Moore? Too much reverse electron flow through complex I? Reading Peter's Protons (30) blog for answers -- http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.com/2013/11/protons-30-uncoupling-and-metabolic.html

    Cr(III) and Cr(VI) effects on the mitochondrial permeability transition pore -- http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1387700310000948

    The results suggest that Cr(VI) induces the opening of the membrane permeability transition pore (MPT)

    The results obtained demonstrated that the Cr(III) does not induce the opening of the MPT in isolated mitochondria, but it has a protective effect in preventing Cr(VI) MPT opening.
    Wikipedia -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitochondrial_permeability_transition_pore . The section 'Factors in MPT induction' states that high levels of Ca2+ within the mitochondria can cause the MPT to open.

    ----

    No clue whether all this is relevant, but more info is always better.
     
  2. yewwei.tan

    yewwei.tan Gold

    Spent 1-hour looking into some stuff. I didn't find any answers in EMF4. EMF3 was good though -- http://jackkruse.com/emf-3-the-origin-of-life/

    Cyanobacteria need A LOT of iron to photosynthesize.

    Some random papers:
    The importance of shape in complex proteins made me investigate the shape of smaller molecules are well. Iron and Sulfur both form Orthorhombic crystals -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orthorhombic_crystal_system . Iron usually in a Body-centred Cube (BBC) at regular temperatures, and Sulfur as a primitive cube.

    Sidenote: Nitrogen forms hexagonal crystals. Same as Carbon​

    All the iron-sulfur clusters used in biology maintain a simple cubic shape -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron-sulfur_protein

    This is the most symmetrical crystal lattice structure -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_structure

    I have no basis for making this statement except for childish ignorance, but it looks to me like the simple cube, unlike the Face-centred cube, and Body-centered cube, is a "weak" structure. There seems to be nothing in the middle of the cube to "support it", meaning that we've got space for electron flow and less energy is required to disrupt the structure. Disruptions in structure => we've got a mechanism for sensing changes.

    Then I found this paper 'Low-energy spectrum of iron-sulfur clusters directly from many-particle quantum mechanics' -- http://arxiv.org/pdf/1408.5080.pdf

    I don't understand 90% of that paper, but I think the abstract is remarkable enough:

    Here we present the first ever quantum calculation of the electronic levels of [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-
    4S] clusters free from any model assumptions.

    In particular, we demonstrate that the widely used Heisenberg-Double-Exchange model underestimates the number of states by 1-2 orders of magnitude, which can conclusively be traced to the absence of Fe d→d excitations, thought to be important in these clusters.

    Further, the electronic energy levels of even the same spin are dense on the scale of vibrational fluctuations, and this provides a natural explanation for the ubiquity of these clusters in nature for catalyzing reactions.
    They went on to describe intra-cluster variations of electron energy configurations and spin alignments that lead to a whole bunch of variations in the magnetic characteristics of the cluster. eg: one pair of Fe-S can be ferromagnetic, and the adjacent pair can be antiferromagnetic.

    The low-energy state of the simple cubic structure also leaves lots of energetic head-space for further excitation => your sensor granularity is pretty fine. Relaxation back to the ground state would emit specific frequencies of light into the "hollow lattice" structure of adjacten clusters, and provide a very fast and efficient means of information transfer. The cubic structure also means efficient stacking behaviour, so refractive issues are less of a concern.

    Again, the sciene is over my head with this quick reading. I'll probably give it a good 2-hour read when I have the time (and if Jack confirms that this is important).

    Anyway, my thought is that this is a natural, easy-to-make, EMF-responsive sensor of the Earth's magnetic field before there were any of the complex proteins that eukaryotes developed.

    There must also be a simple and fundamental reason why Fe2+ solution is green, and Fe3+ solution is yellow (though it is not that soluble). Chlorophyll obviously could only be formed most efficiently using iron given the emission spectrum of the Sun (which was Saturn at the time).

    =====

    That's it for today, come back tomorrow for more reading. :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2014
    wildperoxin and Optimalbound like this.
  3. av8r

    av8r New Member

    Nitrogen is below Oxygen… Hypoxia?
     
  4. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    Are you mentally dexterous, flexible, and skillful at what you do? Do you want to live your life like an eagle soaring in the sky? To successfully navigate your way through life requires a certain dexterity. One that paradoxically allows you to 'harness the power of the wind’ while still cutting into that wind while charting your own course. Don't become a dexterous manipulator of nature, instead realize the most important discoveries in life are suggested to us by our failures. All I want to be is a wandering teacher touching billions of lives with nature's truth's. I plan on being the monk who "never bought a Ferrari".

    The keys' Yew has found are these:
    All the iron-sulfur clusters used in biology maintain a simple cubic shape -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron-sulfur_protein

    This is the most symmetrical crystal lattice structure -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_structure

    I have no basis for making this statement except for childish ignorance, but it looks to me like the simple cube, unlike the Face-centred cube, and Body-centered cube, is a "weak" structure. There seems to be nothing in the middle of the cube to "support it", meaning that we've got space for electron flow and less energy is required to disrupt the structure. Disruptions in structure => we've got a mechanism for sensing changes.

    Then I found this paper 'Low-energy spectrum of iron-sulfur clusters directly from many-particle quantum mechanics' --http://arxiv.org/pdf/1408.5080.pdf

    I don't understand 90% of that paper, but I think the abstract is remarkable enough:

    Here we present the first ever quantum calculation of the electronic levels of [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-
    4S] clusters free from any model assumptions.

    In particular, we demonstrate that the widely used Heisenberg-Double-Exchange model underestimates the number of states by 1-2 orders of magnitude, which can conclusively be traced to the absence of Fe d→d excitations, thought to be important in these clusters.

    Further, the electronic energy levels of even the same spin are dense on the scale of vibrational fluctuations, and this provides a natural explanation for the ubiquity of these clusters in nature for catalyzing reactions.
    They went on to describe intra-cluster variations of electron energy configurations and spin alignments that lead to a whole bunch of variations in the magnetic characteristics of the cluster. eg: one pair of Fe-S can be ferromagnetic, and the adjacent pair can be antiferromagnetic.

    The low-energy state of the simple cubic structure also leaves lots of energetic head-space for further excitation => your sensor granularity is pretty fine. Relaxation back to the ground state would emit specific frequencies of light into the "hollow lattice" structure of adjacten clusters, and provide a very fast and efficient means of information transfer. The cubic structure also means efficient stacking behaviour, so refractive issues are less of a concern.
     
    wildperoxin, Scompy and sjoshua like this.
  5. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    Transition metals are a big key to the puzzle.........I have always taught you that.

    Sulfur is mighty important too for another quantum reason.........
     
    wildperoxin and rlee314 like this.
  6. NeilBB

    NeilBB New Member

    http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ar5002507
    Iron–sulfur cluster proteins exhibit a range of physicochemical properties that underpin their functional diversity in biology, which includes roles in electron transfer, catalysis, and gene regulation. Transcriptional regulators that utilize iron–sulfur clusters are a growing group that exploit the redox and coordination properties of the clusters to act as sensors of environmental conditions including O2, oxidative and nitrosative stress, and metabolic nutritional status.
     
  7. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    Cyanobacteria need A LOT of iron to photosynthesize.

    Some random papers:

    How this happens.......it critically important to eukaryotes too.........because they use the mechanism to improve mitochondrial efficiency just like plants increase photosynthetic ability.

    Tensegrity 8 was hinting at this big time.
     
  8. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    If you go all the way back to the blog Evolutionary friend or foe and read what I wrote about Iron there and see how the iron story has been slowly teased out.........over 20 blogs you'll see I been slowly trying to get you to realize where the rubbber meets the road with nnEMF is at Fe/S clusters. Fe and S have very critical stories in eukarytoes.
     
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  9. NeilBB

    NeilBB New Member

  10. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    ^^^^^now we are getting some where.........this tells you why mitochondria are fundamentally couples nano electromagnets that are temperature probes.
     
  11. NeilBB

    NeilBB New Member

    How's this: There are 8-10 Fe-S clusters in NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, better known as mitochondrial complex I. Failure of electron tunneling in complex I is the hallmark of metabolic syndrome (and many other diseases). Complex 1 is exquisitely sensitive to magnetism and temperature in the environment, through the complicated geometry of the 3D molecular-electronic nature of the Fe-S structures it contains... Clusters can employ "spintronics" -- internal electronic spin variation with temperature to become paramagnetic, ferromagnetic, or anti-ferromagnetic at different times to alter their function... (Kruse Law/Neil version again BTW)

    http://www.pnas.org/content/107/45/19157.full
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2014
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  12. NeilBB

    NeilBB New Member

    Jimmy's strategy (aggressive ketosis) work fairly well for him for a while because of this:

    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0005272810000113#

    But, it is only a temporary fix. Ketosis works well for a while, it prevents the massive ROS at complex I and halts a lot of the symptoms of metabolic syndrome, BUT continued ketosis without re-establishment of proper circadian cycling won't allow the proteins to turnover. EVER. So his mitochondria are full of rotten proteins with rusted cores. He has traded one problem for another-he is less obese, etc, but aging fast with contorted mitochondrial proteins...

    The accumulated damage from the nn-EMF is never being recycled in Jimmy. Jack exposes himself to a lot of nn-EMF in surgery, but the difference is that Jack concentrates on strategies that constantly recycle his proteins and membranes when necessary (sleep, magnetism, cold, protein/DHA intake, light). Jimmy's proteins can't go anywhere. There is no autophagy. They can't be ubiquinated. They just stay there and accumulate more damage from more and more nn-EMF. That's why he's not doing as well now as he was 2 years ago with the same strategy. He can't sleep. The slightest amount of carbs crushes him. His proteins are shot-his iron is rusted. His agressive ketosis was like a life raft that saved him from a sinking ship. True. But you can't live on a raft forever--it wears out. You gotta do better than that... You have to build a new boat. You build it with new proteins and with DHA. And then you protect it from the storm of nn-EMF as best you can. And when it gets a hole in the deck, you fix it. And the cycle goes on. That's life...
     
  13. NeilBB

    NeilBB New Member


    The calcium efflux from nn-EMF also destroys sulfate levels widely. Leading to lack of sulfated cholesterol and sulfated Vit D, as previously mentioned.

    eNOS can synthesize sulfate from superoxide in the right circadian environment!!

    Three special gases??
    Hydrogen sulfide
    Nitrous oxide
    Carbon monoxide

    Influence vascular tone and oxygen flow

    NO can take over for H2S, but with many more adverse effects...
     
  14. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    Then you need to understand why Fe and S dance in quantum fashion. Why? O and S are kissing cousins.

    What is the difference??

    Elemental oxygen consists of O2 molecules in which each atom completes its octet of valence electrons by sharing two pairs of electrons with a single neighboring atom. Because sulfur does not form strong S=S double bonds, elemental sulfur usually consists of cyclic S8 molecules in which each atom completes its octet by forming single bonds to two neighboring atoms. So how does life fix this problem? I takes the D shell electrons of Fe and binds them with Sulfur to make a perfect electron tunneler to be a perfect seasonal electromagnet for the electromagnetic force. Remember the force carrier for this force is what? ........the photon. So an electron tunneler is just like a sundial
     
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  15. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator


    Neil and Yew are in the front row............of this quantum class.
     
  16. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    Three special gases??
    Hydrogen sulfide
    Nitrous oxide
    Carbon monoxide


    BOOM CUBED!
     
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  17. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    Why? eNOS we covered. Biology covers CO. No one is covering H2S. Why? They dont understand that H2S is another special quantum gas.......that is what rebuilds glutathione using quantum principles.......not biochemical ones. Taking glutathione is a giant waste of time. Surprise!
     
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  18. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    Now go back and re read EMF 4 and EE12..........and see what I said there about cysteine, sulfur, double bonds, and other things. It was even in the mitochodnrial Rx blog if memory serves me.
     
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  19. Jack Kruse

    Jack Kruse Administrator

    H2S is the core reason magnetism resides in your cytochromes. It is here where the signal begins. H2S is a synonym for cold and magnetism. If you look at the environmental effects of sulfur on any planet what does it do? It lowers the temperature............any thing that lowers temperature increases magnetism.........via the curie principle of magnetism. QED 101. I said this in Pasadena.
     
  20. NeilBB

    NeilBB New Member

    You slipped another chemical in that last blog (TG-7) too. Very subtly... BH4 or tetrahydrobiopterin...
    Big player in the NO story, and maybe hypertension...
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC152929/
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2014
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